Block Copolymers

Block Copolymers

 

polymers having macromolecules in which comparatively long sequences of the links of one monomer (blocks) alternate with blocks of another monomer. The macromolecule of a block copolymer may be represented schematically in the form ~ AAAABBBB . . . BBBAAAAA ~, where A and B are monomer links of a different chemical nature.

References in periodicals archive ?
Chemistry researchers are using block copolymers to create the first carbon fibers with a uniform porous structure.
Block copolymers are promising to solve above problems because of a well-defined molecular structure [2], Many studies have shown that the mechanical and rheological properties of various blends are remarkably improved by adopting block copolymers [3-9].
In recent years, PLA-based amphiphilic block copolymers are the most attractive nanocarriers (e.g., nanoparticles, micelles, and polymersomes) for drugs [9-13].
4, 2016), "Additives for Orientation Control of Block Copolymers, "Joy Cheng, Anindarupa Chunder, Daniel P.
The self-assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers in selective solvents can result in the formation of a wide variety of aggregates, such as spheres, rods, and bilayers [1].
Summary: Block copolymers are widely used as stabilizers in industrial dispersions.
Block copolymers for use in coatings to improve impact resistance consist of a block that is compatible with the matrix and a second block that is incompatible.
SBS was followed by HSBC (Hydrogenated Styrenic Block Copolymers) which accounted for 13.2 percent of total market volume in 2013.
The result indicated that, as shown in Scheme 1, when the upconverting hybrid nanoparticles were irradiated by NIR light, the UCNPs converted NIR to UV light to induce the photocleavage reaction of NBA moieties in situ; then, as a result of the LCST change of the block copolymers, nanoparticles disintegrated and released the loaded NR molecules.
This approach combines top-down advanced ink-jet printing technology with a bottom-up approach that involves self-assembling block copolymers, a type of material that can spontaneously form ultrafine structures.
When the blocks spontaneously microphase-separate, a wide range of structures, such as lamellae, double gyroids, cylinders, and spheres, is formed in block copolymers depending on copolymer composition and preparation conditions [6, 13-15].
Now at the University of Bristol, Manners collaborates with another U of T chemistry professor, Mitch Winnik, on block copolymers that combine PFS with various other polymers.