complete blood count

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complete blood count

[kəm′plēt ′bləd ‚kau̇nt]
(pathology)
Differential and absolute determinations of the numbers of each type of blood cell in a sample and, by extrapolation, in the general circulation.
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Health conditions that are associated with a low red blood cell count include ulcers in the digestive tract, chronic kidney disease, underactive thyroid, and some types of cancer.
There exists a huge potential to translate our biosensor commercially for blood cell counts applications," says lead study author Umer Hassan, PhD.
Total platelet counts and white blood cell counts were measured and participants were grouped according to their levels (low, normal, or high), based on age- and gender-specific cut-offs.
Cyclists and other athletes use EPO to raise their red blood cell counts, which increases the amount of oxygen that can be delivered to muscles, improving recovery and endurance.
The report, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, found higher white blood cell counts were found in men with a greater proportion of body fat.
A truly septic joint was defined as a positive joint fluid culture or a white blood cell count in the joint fluid of 50,000 cells/[mm.
The samples were taken from a database compiled between 1992 and 1997 at Children's Hospital in Boston, in which all children in the emergency department between the ages of 3 days and 89 days received a white blood cell count and blood culture if they had a fever greater than 38[degrees]C.
On day 25, persistent, loculated pleural effusions--which were thought to be a source of a continually elevated white blood cell count and which could not be drained by multiple thoracostomy incisions--required left video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery with decortication.
Myelosuppressive chemotherapy often upsets the patient's white blood cell count, leading to febrile neutropenia.
In a comparison of laboratory data from patients with positive blood cultures (278 cultures) and patients with negative cultures (395 cultures), white blood cell count was significantly higher in those with bacteremia (15,160 [micro]L vs.