Bloomsday


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Bloomsday

June 16
James Joyce's novel Ulysses describes the events of a single day in Dublin: June 16, 1904. First published in Paris in 1922 because it had been banned elsewhere, Ulysses caused an uproar when it finally did appear in Ireland, and for a time, Joyce was reviled by the people of Dublin. But since 1954 Bloomsday—named after the novel's main character, Leopold Bloom—has been a Joycean feast day, observed with a number of events throughout Dublin that commemorate its illustrious author and the lives of his characters. There is a ritual pilgrimage along the "Ulysses Trail" (the path followed by Leopold Bloom), public readings from the novel, costume parties, and parades. Joyce fans can visit the Martello Tower, where the author lived, the James Joyce Centre, and Davy Byrne's Pub, where Leopold Bloom stops on his day-long odyssey. Restaurants specialize in serving the dishes that Bloom ate: kidneys for breakfast, gorgonzola cheese and burgundy for lunch.
CONTACTS:
James Joyce Centre
35 N Great Georges St.
Dublin, 1 Ireland
353-1-8788547; fax: 353-1-8788488
www.jamesjoyce.ie
Dublin Tourism
Tourism Centre
Suffolk St.
Dublin, 2 Ireland
353-1-6057700; fax: 353-1-6057757
www.visitdublin.com
SOURCES:
AnnivHol-2000, p. 101
DictDays-1988, p. 13
OxYear-1999, p. 252
References in periodicals archive ?
Readers of the New York Times Sunday Magazine will know that the profile, written by noted journalist Jack Hitt and titled "The Strange Case of the Missing Joyce Scholar," came out on June 12 of 2018, just in time for Bloomsday and the annual James Joyce Symposium being held in Antwerp, June 11-16.
Bloomsday is named after fictional character Leopold Bloom, from James Joyce's Ulysses, and it is celebrated on June 16, the date in 1904 on which the novel is set.
The city depicted is not so far removed from the Dublin of Bloomsday in 1904 and some of the images (those of Barney Kieman's pub and the Sandycove Martello Tower in particular) spark rich associations with the novel.
She covers British Israelites, Irish Israelites, and Ireland's Jews; Lady Gregory, Parnell, and the Irish Deliverer; anti-exodus: Patrick Pearse's "New Testament of Irish Nationality;" A Pisgah Sight of Palestine from dear dirty Dublin; and a Bloomsday Seder: Joyce and Jewish memory.
So to celebrate Irish literature, the Soloneion Book Centre in Nicosia along with the Embassy of Ireland in Cyprus, will be putting on an evening to celebrate Bloomsday (this is where Joyce comes in) and the 150th birthday of Yeats.
VVGOOGLING a runner Bloomsday 2.55 Thurles a celebration of irish writer James Joyce, bloomsday relives the events of his novel Ulysses, which is set on June 16, 1904.
One of the attractions is the inclusion, in one place, of a range of different types of maps - from the historic maps of the city, including reproductions of Speed (1610), Brooking (1728), Rocque (1756) and the 1st edition Ordnance Survey six inch map (1837), to a depiction of the routes followed on Bloomsday, the major locations of the Easter Rising in 1916, the early twentieth-century tram and rail system, a map of urban growth from the medieval period to the year 2000 and another which indicates the location of all protected archaeological sites listed in the Record of Monuments and Places.
At least once a year, the tower has a cameo role in another literary endeavor, the annual celebration of Bloomsday, when devotees of James Joyce's "Ulysses'' use the spot as a backdrop for reading a portion of that famous novel.
June 16, Bloomsday is a good excuse to hit the pubs of Dublin.
That is what it is "to live." It's no wonder that when an unlikely (and happy!) marriage in this novel happens on Bloomsday, at an altar covered in flowers, the reader feels not relief but dread.
Getting through this is the price of entry (or rather the cost of exit, as it is how the novel ends) for those who can plausibly claim to be devotees of "Bloomsday".
For the literary minded, June 16 is Bloomsday, a day that commemorates the life of Irish writer James Joyce and coincides with the date that events take place in his most famous novel, Ulysses.