blotting paper

(redirected from Blotter paper)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

blotting paper

[′bläd·iŋ ‚pā·pər]
(materials)
An unsized paper used to absorb excess ink from penned letters or signatures; also used for other applications where a soft, spongy paper is required.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Totally nine fungi with six genera were isolated by standard blotter paper and agar plate method i.e.
Key words: Rice, mycoflora, agar plate method, blotter paper method, Curvularia lunata.
The suggested number of layers (column 4) relates to the number of blotter paper to be superimposed to form the standard absorbent pad referred to in the respective methods.
The plastic boxes with blotter paper, liquid, and seed were placed in the cold temperature room at 4[degrees]C and 40% relative humidity.
Preparation of petri dishes began by filling each to a depth of 0.5 cm with washed river sand or with two layers of blotter paper. Moist pretreatment dishes were wetted with 10 ml distilled water (pH 5), and excess water was drained from each dish.
Herbarium Supply Company (800/348-2338) offers a 12- by 18-inch press, newsprint, 30 pieces of blotter paper, and cardboard for $68.45.
The same drop of blood on the same blotter paper used to test for the other six disorders can be used for additional tests.
KS-282, Basmati-385, Basmati-370, Basmati Kernal and Basmati-198 were studied to investigate the occurrence of seed-borne mycoflora using blotter paper method.
We began by soaking etching paper for a short time in water, placing the etching paper between two sheets of blotter paper, and then laying the paper on top of the carved, inkless linoleum.
It may be distributed in breath-mint vials, treated sugar cubes, gel wafers called "windowpanes," pills, or decorated blotter paper that is chewed or swallowed.
A common technique for studying inscriptions is to produce what is called a "squeeze." This is done by making an impression of the letters with damp (undyed) blotter paper. Once dried, the paper is relatively sturdy--and, of course, easier to handle than stone!
Our examples include smooth blotter paper, colored charcoal paper, and stiffer (3-ply) paper.