Bludgeon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Bludgeon

 

an ancient weapon for dealing blows.

The bludgeon was a short stick with a metal ball suspended from one end by a strap or chain. On the other end there was a loop that could be slipped over the wrist. The bludgeon was carried on one’s belt. It was used in ancient Rus’ and many countries of the Orient.

References in periodicals archive ?
It was that England's bludgeon was neutralised anyway, so they had go wide.
He asked when was the earliest that he or the Aussie back row could tackle the England bludgeon Mike Teague, when he picked up from the back of the scrum to make his usual five yards.
With no joy on the bludgeon, they had to go for the rapier.
In that hard terrain a softer practice point like the Saunders Bludgeon would have been more suitable.
Both the Saunders Bludgeon and the HTM Small Game Blunt have a bit of "give" to them, making them perfect for hard terrain.
It would only be logical to ask: Why not use a Saunders Bludgeon all the time?
Recording conclusions of unlawful killing yesterday, HM Coroner for Cumbria David Roberts said: "Whatever may have been concluded in working with this young man, no-one could have seen that he would bludgeon his mother and sister to death.
In essence, the feds are using the tool to bludgeon a private company into providing proprietary information to which Washington has no right, but might help them back up the argument that Internet filters do not protect children from pornography.
Walker told the meeting the task force said they were going to bludgeon his family's emu because the bird was too big for a bag.
But if by marriage you mean a piece of paper signed in a fluorescent-lit city hall, that remnant of medieval property law that held that a woman is the chattel of her husband, that codified yardstick used as a moral bludgeon by bully preachers, that restrictive moral interpretation that perversely asserts marriage is marriage only if there is sexual monogamy, a line on a Federal 1040 form, and the intrusion of the state into those aspects of my life that are most sacred, mystical, and holy--if this is the kind of nonsense you mean by marriage, I am against it with all my heart.
The problems arise because there are a few too many of those tragedies for narrative comfort, and even the lesser ones too often are delivered with an emotional bludgeon.
But such inexplicable massiveness seems to work in such a place even as it bludgeons that place with its banal weight.