blue asbestos


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blue asbestos

[¦blü as′bes·təs]
(mineralogy)

riebeckite asbestos

A type of mineral derived from a monoclinic amphibole.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"I also seriously wonder if the teachers who have passed away from lung cancer already actually died due to the blue asbestos."
Crocidolite (blue asbestos) was commonly used in high temperature applications.
"Blue asbestos and brown asbestos were banned in 1985 but it is only since 1999 that it became illegal to use any type of asbestos in the construction or refurbishment of buildings.
It was here that he unloaded bags, including deadly blue asbestos, from railway carriages.
Commonly white and brown asbestos in floor tiles, plastic toilet cisterns, artex coatings and blue asbestos in asbestos cement products.
Mr Mann described his job welding in a room while a colleague sprayed deadly blue asbestos on the walls.
So far, the study has been focused to blue asbestos (Crocidolite), a part of the amphibole group of asbestos minerals that were used in such products as ceiling tiles and thermal insulation, before being banned in most of the Western world by the mid-Eighties.
Barry Castleman, an expert on the history of asbestos, "asbestos industry, doctors and industrial hygienists came to serve increasingly as salesmen for the industry as it came under fire, trying to persuade customers that the scientific evidence wasn't so frightening." The main tactic of the CI was to suggest that chrysotile white asbestos was different in this respect from crocidilite ("blue asbestos") and amosite ("brown asbestos").
Australia and South Africa are the only countries to have mined crocidolite or blue asbestos. Crocidolite was mined in the Northern Cape for one hundred years and at Wittenoom in Western Australia from 1944 until 1966.
The potentially lethal blue asbestos has been found in the 10-storey block at Bootle's Alliance & Leicester bank.