blue laser

(redirected from Blue laser diode)
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blue laser

[¦blü ¦lā·zər]
(optics)
A laser that emits bluish-purple light efficiently at room temperature from a semiconductor diode based on multiple quantum wells of III-V nitrides such as indium gallium nitride.

blue laser

A semiconductor laser that emits light in the 400-450 nm range. Although it was very difficult developing blue lasers, which emit smaller wavelengths than other colors, blue lasers became commercially available in 2001. Blue diode lasers allow for smaller pits to be used in optical discs (CD-ROMs use 780 nm pits; DVDs are 630 nm).

Blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs), a related technology, were also difficult to manufacture, but became practical and widely used after the turn of the century. See Blu-ray and UDO.
References in periodicals archive ?
is an advanced electronic materials provider that is engaged in developing, manufacturing and selling monocrystalline sapphire and other crystalline products for light-emitting diodes (LEDs), radio frequency integrated circuits (RFICs), blue laser diodes, optoelectronics and other optical applications.
A sampling of topics: blue laser diodes by low temperature plasma assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, mesoporous crystals of transition metal oxides, magnetic anisotropy of Co films annealed by laser pulses, formation of carbon fibers in high- voltage low-current electrical discharges, nanotechnology for treating damaged organs, nanomaterials in dental applications, enhanced fatigue properties of ultrafine-grained titanium rods produced using severe plastic deformation, nanostructure formation in austenitic stainless steel, and the effect of grain size distribution on the mechanical properties of nanometals.
Sharp is undecided on the output volume of the blue lasers because large-capacity, next-generation DVD players, in which blue laser diodes will be put into practical use, are not being produced yet, he said.
In MO, blue laser diodes would drastically reduce recording spot sizes and, thereby, increase areal densities; but nobody has yet produced a commercially viable blue diode--one that's small enough or cheap enough, or lasts long enough to be practical.
This technology is costlier than red and blue laser diodes and less efficient than direct green lasers.
Other applications of Nano ZnO include anti-microbials, conductive thin-films in blue laser diodes, solar cells, and LCDs, protective coatings, capacitors, varistors, photoprinting and electrophotography.