blue straggler star

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blue straggler star

[¦blü ′strag·lər ‚stär]
(astronomy)
A member of a star cluster that lies above the turnoff point of the cluster's Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, and lies near the main sequence.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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To better understand cluster ageing, the team mapped the location of blue straggler stars in 21 globular clusters, as seen in images from Hubble and the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, among other observatories.
"Blue Straggler" is a novel following Baily Miller, quickly approaching midlife with no real roots she can call her own.
"Basically, in a mass-transfer scenario, the reason one star ends up as a blue straggler is that its companion dumps mass on it," says Christian Knigge (Southampton University, England).
The extent of the blue straggler population detected provides two new constraints for models of the star-formation history of the bulge," he stated.
Blue Straggler Stars "A puzzling feature of many globular clusters is the presence in them of an appreciable number of fairly hot stars, in apparent defiance of the modern theory of stellar evolution....
Many researchers believe the typical blue straggler arises from two elderly, lower-mass stars that collided and merged to form a massive, hotter star.
A team of astronomers used Hubble to study the blue straggler star content in Messier 30, which formed 13 billion years ago and was discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier.
"That means if a given blue straggler formed with the rest of its star cluster, it should have died billions of years ago," Knigge said.
All of this points to "stellar cannibalism" as the primary mechanism for blue straggler formation.
These stars are so crowded that they can, at times, slam into each other and even form a new star, called a "blue straggler."
The largest known concentration of "blue straggler" stars has astronomers puzzled about what's going on at the center of globular cluster M80 in Scorpius (located at R.A.