bluebonnet

(redirected from Bluebonnets)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Bluebonnets: Lupinus texensis

lupine

lupine or lupin (lo͞oˈpĭn), any species of the genus Lupinus, annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of the family Leguminosae (pulse family). These leguminous plants have been cultivated in the Mediterranean region since ancient times for enriching the soil. The seeds of some species have been roasted or boiled and used as food to some extent in that locality and in the Andes, and the leafy parts are used as forage both there and in America. Some of the many species native to the American West are poisonous as forage, causing the disease lupinosis to which sheep are especially susceptible. Poisonous species and their effects have not been fully determined. As a garden flower the lupine is a favorite because of the various colors and the tall spikes of bonnet-shaped blossoms. The leaves are usually composed of leaflets radiating to form a rounded handlike leaf. Certain movements, as from the horizontal to a vertical position, are characteristic of the leaves of some of these plants, e.g., the common wild lupine (L. perennis), also called sundial and quaker bonnet. The bluebonnet, or buffalo clover (L. subcarnosus), is the state flower of Texas, where it carpets the plains in springtime with its blue blossoms. In Scotland the name bluebonnet is given to the cornflower. The false lupine belongs to the genus Thermopsis. Lupine is classified in the division Magnoliophyta, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2022, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved.

bluebonnet

of Texas. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 643]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ephemeris For February The phases of the Texas Bluebonnet Moon
Springtime was the perfect opportunity for this nature lover to get re-acquainted with Mother Nature, and she surely sent some of her best ambassadors to re-start the relations, namely wild primroses, scarlet poppies and that Texas treasure, the bluebonnet. Even you non-outdoorsy types would enjoy the sight and smell of springtime in Austin.
What began in 1983 with ten acres of bluebonnets for the Texas Highway Department has become one of the largest privately owned wildflower farms in the United States.
Austin was on the verge of recovering from the '80s real-estate bust as silicon wafers sprang up like hill-country bluebonnets. Today, it is a city where granola meets high-tech meets college intelligentsia meets cowboy-stock meets Hispanic meets black meets straight meets gay meets East and West Coast transplants.
Young and old are flocking to see the blooms-from tulips in Michigan, lilacs in New York and bluebonnets in Texas.
They are multiplying like Texas bluebonnets in spring: support networks for patients.
Has: mesquite, white crepe myrtle, pink crepe myrtle, mimosa, McIntosh ash, silver maple, chinaberry, century plant, mount laurel, red bud, live oak, red oak, morning glory vines, bluebonnets, holly
The tracks are "Sun Comes Back" (3:43), "Your Neighbor's Trampoline" (3:49), "Let Me Down Easy" (3:37), "If You're Gonna Go" (4:27), "Desdemona" (3:58), "Nashville" (3:34), "Pretty Good Today" (4:03), "Stone Around My Neck" (4:33), "What Do You Bury?" (5:17), "Heart Broken Open" (4:18), and "Bluebonnets" (4:26).
Behind it is a field planted with bluebonnets, dotted on the edges by yellow black-eyed Susans and snow-white black-foot daisies.
In the early spring we spade up volunteer bluebonnets in the pasture with clumps of dirt to transplant around the yard.
While some of its work is based in the lab--for example, researchers have identified which plants make the best hosts for the partly parasitic Indian paintbrush and have discovered ways to make bluebonnets perform better in the field--the NWRC is perhaps best known for its highway beautification projects, in which native seeds are sprinkled alongside and down the center of highways from Wyoming to Texas.