bluetongue

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bluetongue

[′blü‚təŋ]
(veterinary medicine)
An arthropod-borne disease of ruminant species that is caused by a ribonucleic acid–containing virus in the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae; acute infection evokes high fever, excessive salivation, nasal discharge, hyperemia (buccal and nasal mucosa, skin, coronet band), and erosions and ulcerations of mucosal surfaces in the mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Monitoring bluetongue disease (BTV-1) epidemic in southern Spain during 2007.
But Government restrictions banning the movement of animals from across south-east England after the outbreak of bluetongue disease has left the reindeer stranded in Kent.
Farmers across Wales were urged to remain vigilant last night as Prime Minister Gordon Brown revealed 11 cases of bluetongue disease in England.
THE British Horseracing Authority yesterday said that there should be "no impact on horseracing at all" after the first case of bluetongue disease was discovered in Britain and despite a second cow at the same farm testing positive, a spokeswoman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said the evidence remained insufficient to confirm an outbreak.
A NEW threat emerged for Britain's farmers last night as bluetongue disease - spread by midges - joined foot and mouth as a menace to their livestock.
Bluetongue disease causes about $120 million in annual losses to domestic livestock producers, mainly in lost exports to countries that do not have the disease.
Other reoviruses, called orbiviruses, pose a significant veterinary threat, causing an equine disease called African horse sickness and bluetongue disease in sheep and cattle.
Industry Developments The appearance of bluetongue disease in cattle poses a small downside risk to our beef production outlook.
Clinical signs of bluetongue disease (BT) are usually more severe in sheep or white-tailed deer, particularly in populations previously unexposed to the virus; cattle and goats are often asymptomatic (1).
been infected by the bluetongue disease, Kuwait's Public Authority for
In April 2010, Russia lifted the 10-year ban on import of meat and animal products from Bulgaria, which was introduced because of registered bluetongue disease in animals in 1999.
Taking advantage of technological developments to consolidate the suppression of bluetongue disease in the EU, the European Commission decided, on 15 November, to amend Directive 2000/75/EC in order to update current rules on vaccination by bringing them in line with recent technological developments in vaccine production, thus allowing the use of vaccines in the whole territory of the EU.