Blume, Peter

Blume, Peter

(blo͞om), 1906–92, American painter, b. Russia. Blume immigrated to the United States in 1911. In his early work, such as The Parade (1930; Mus. of Modern Art, New York City), he sought to depict through symbolism the smooth, hard contours of the industrial world. His paintings, which gained recognition in the 1930s, are precise, linear, and fantastic treatments of modern social themes. Painted in microscopic detail, they skillfully mingle social and magic realism. Major works include the powerful antifascist The Eternal City (1934–37; Mus. of Modern Art), The Rock (1945–48; Art Inst., Chicago), and Tasso's Oak (1957–60).

Bibliography

See exhibition catalogs by F. Getlein (1968) and R. Cozzolino (2015).

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Blume, Peter

(1906–92) painter; born in Smorgon, Russia. He emigrated in 1911, and after various occupations, became an artist who utilized bizarre imagery in a surrealistic manner. He worked in Italy as an intermittent artist in residence at the American Academy of Rome (1956–73), and thereafter was based in Sherman, Connecticut. His most famous work is The Eternal City (1934–37), a denunciation of Fascism in Italy.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.