Bluntschli, Johann Kaspar

Bluntschli, Johann Kaspar

(yō`hän käs`pär blo͝onch`lē), 1808–81, Swiss jurist and political scientist. Trained at the Univ. of Berlin, he taught law at Zürich, Munich, and Heidelberg. He expounded the organic theory of the state in Allgemeines Staatsrecht (2 vol., 1851–52; partial tr. 1892), carrying the theory to a complete equation of the life of a state and the life of a person. In Deutsches Privatrecht [German private law] (2 vol., 1853–54), he attempted to contrast the indigenous elements in German law with those derived from Roman law. Bluntschli was of some political importance in Baden as a spokesman of the liberal Protestant middle class favoring unification of Germany under Prussia, and he was a founder of the Institute of International Law at Ghent.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bluntschli, Johann Kaspar

 

Born 1808; died 1881. Swiss jurist. Specialist on state and international law as well as the history of law. Bluntschli was a representative of the organic school of law. His major work is Modern International Law of Civilized Nations (1868; Russian translation, 1876).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.