Boccaccio


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Boccaccio

Giovanni . 1313--75, Italian poet and writer, noted particularly for his Decameron(1353), a collection of 100 short stories. His other works include Filostrato(?1338) and Teseida (1341)
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8) Greek passages of this venerable codex had been translated, on commission of Pisa's government, by Leonzio Pilato, who was assigned by Boccaccio to translate another text from the same language: Homer.
Die dritte Sektion beleuchtet Boccaccios Umgang mit Mythen.
Hallam's treatment of Shakespeare, Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch, and Dante as themselves assimilative poets was not idiosyncratic; it was a convention of Romantic-era accounts of European literary history.
Furthermore, he is aligning himself with Boccaccio who asserts, in the Conclusion of his work, that in writing these tales he has, perhaps, 'troppa licenza usata,' but he also quickly adds, 'per cio che niuna si disonesta n'e, che, con onesti vocaboli dicendola, si disdica ad alcuno'; Rebhorn translates this as follows: 'for there is no story so unseemly that it may not be told, provided it is couched in seemly language, as I think I have done very well here.
7), set in the reign of King Guglielmo of Sicily, indicates that Boccaccio was aware of Genoese involvement in the enslavement of children from Western Asia, albeit in this case of Christian Armenians: "Amerigo Abbate da Trapani [.
As this new set of characters well prove, it is thanks to the art of storytelling that through exposing their most hidden desires, all the while remaining immune to the plague and its inevitable consequences, they can nevertheless celebrate life--a moral lesson that Boccaccio himself would also have been willing to share.
Given Rebhorn's insistence on the intermediate nature of Boccaccio's Decameron--its distinctive quality of straddling "two ages without being part of either" (xxiv)--it is strange that he limits the forward-looking quality of the Decameron, its anticipation of the humanistic aesthetic and moral values that paved the way to the Renaissance, to its earthiness, secularity, and sensual materialism (which he contrasts with the "idealism of medieval romance" [xxiv]), declaring that Boccaccio "does not share the classicizing bent in it [i.
Giovanni Boccaccio estaba en Florencia cuando la peste negra invadio la ciudad, en marzo de 1348.
Ya en aquella ocasion adelantabamos que, pese a estos posibles precedentes, El Polytheismo elucidado era en realidad una peculiar, tardia y no reconocida version de la Genealogia de los dioses paganos, de Giovanni Boccaccio.
Chaucer is a staple of any medieval English degree, but both Henryson and this particular Boccaccio text are much less familiar.
4) Robert Edwards notes, however, that while Statius's poem chronicling the tragedies of Thebes is an emblem of "rage encoded historically across generations," Boccaccio "fully inscribes a medieval aristocratic ideology in his classical world.
Boccaccio is best known today for his Italian epic poem Decameron.