Boccaccio


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Boccaccio

Giovanni . 1313--75, Italian poet and writer, noted particularly for his Decameron(1353), a collection of 100 short stories. His other works include Filostrato(?1338) and Teseida (1341)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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In tale contesto, Barsella conclude che nella novella Boccaccio rimarca "l'inadeguatezza dell'insegnamento morale della Chiesa" e sostiene il recupero dell'etica classica "al fine di armonizzare i valori ideali cristiani con la realta pragmatica della societa mercantile" (148).
Im Fokus des zweiten Teils stehen die beiden Sammelbiographien Boccaccios. In einem erhellenden Vergleich von De casibus mit Petrarcas De viris illustribus deckt Alexander Winkler die oft verkannten kompositorischen Starken Boccaccios gegenuber seinem Freund und maestro auf.
I argue that Tennyson was working from a version of the Lady of Shalott tale found in a widely circulated essay on Boccaccio-and Boccaccio's source hunters-by the expatriate Italian poet and critic Ugo Foscolo.
On the subject of Boccaccio's long sentences formed by lines of subordinate clauses, the translator states, "I have sometimes been forced to break them up in order to ensure that they are readable in English" (p.
The Decameron, Genoa, the Mamluks, and the Golden Horde As is well known, Boccaccio was intimately familiar with mercantile spheres (especially Genoese): his father was an independent merchant, who joined the Florentine Compagnia de' Bardi as its principal agent at the Neapolitan court of King Robert of Anjou, and Boccaccio spent his early years in this multicultural center of trade and learning (1327-41).
El ano 1350 es fundamental en la vida de Giovanni Boccaccio. Tiene su primer encuentro con Francesco Petrarca en Firenze y empieza a trabajar en su obra de mayor compromiso y mole: la Genealogia deorum gentilium, un tratado de mitologia en quince libros, que no terminara hasta 1375.
Vargas Llosas lengthy introduction on the life of Boccaccio provides the reader with an important context and provides some insight into why he was attracted to Boccaccio's world and the narrative nature of his tales before turning it into a twenty-act play.
Chaucer is a staple of any medieval English degree, but both Henryson and this particular Boccaccio text are much less familiar.
(4) Robert Edwards notes, however, that while Statius's poem chronicling the tragedies of Thebes is an emblem of "rage encoded historically across generations," Boccaccio "fully inscribes a medieval aristocratic ideology in his classical world." (5) The opening books of the Teseida depict an episode that was not developed by Statius but which situates the text in a milieu governed by courtly principles and fueled by chivalric heroism and conventional standards of feminine identity.