Boeotian


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Boeotian

1. a native or inhabitant of Boeotia, a region of ancient Greece
2. of or relating to Boeotia or its inhabitants
References in periodicals archive ?
Federations, like the Boeotian one, and many more during the 7th century are acknowledged as federations, by historians, but what was new in the 4th century federations was their democratic basis, both at the city-state and federal level, as well as their elaborate political and economic structure.
On thy own Offspring hast thou fix'd this Fate, From the first Birth of our unhappy State; When banish'd Cadmus wandring o'er the Main, For lost Europa search'd the world in vain, And fated in Boeotian Fields to found A rising Empire on a foreign Ground.
Schliemann, Bericht uber meine Ausgrabungen im bootischen Orchomenos (Berlin, 1881); 'Exploration of the Boeotian Orchomenos', JHS 2 (1881), 122-130; 'Ausgrabungen in Orchomenos und Kreta', Zeitschrift fur Ethnologie 17 (1886), 376-379.
The Thebans sneak a commando force across the Boeotian hills separating the two cities.
He covers Sparta's overseas battles and the Corinthian War 400-387; Chalcidian, Boeotian, and Spartan wars around the Mediterranean Sea 386-360; the rise of Macedonia and the conquest of Greece and sacred, Persian, and Sicilian wars 359-336; battles in the era of Alexander the Great 335-324; and battles of his successors 323-301.
Theban 'of or pertaining to Boeotian Thebes' (1395) did not have any -ish parallel.
Historical certainty can be added by studying the alliances and the warfare involving Thebes during the era of Sophocles (e.g., Boeotian prefecture, Athenian dynasty, Spartan alliance, Persian wars) (14).
B.C.E.) [sigma] [upsilon] v Ionic prose [sigma] [upsilon] v Boeotian [sigma] [upsilon] v
Similarly, the Deucalion and Pyrrha story draws a bit from that of Noah and Genesis 2 but the trappings are solidly in the world of Greco-Roman theology and geography: Neptune, Triton, Nereids, Boeotian fields and Mt.
272), Heracles' city and the Boeotian metropolis where Hesiod himself comes from, the poet alludes to parties and dances ([TEXTO IRREPRODUCIBLE EN ASCII], v.
Poor Ransom announced this fact to himself as if he had made a great discovery; but in reality he had never been so 'Boeotian' as at that moment.
"The Cambridge/Bradford Boeotian Expedition: The First Four Years," JFA 12, pp.