Bog Deposits

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bog Deposits

 

mineral and organic sediments, accumulating in swamps. Peat predominates among bog deposits, turning in time into “humus” fossil coal. In swamps fed not only by atmospheric moisture but also by springs of underground water, small nodules of carbonates, ferrites, phosphates, and other minerals form in the peat. Sediments of overgrown lakes can also give rise to bog deposits. Such layers of clay, sand, friable limestone, and particularly sapropel turn eventually into saprolites (boghead coal, cannel coal, and others).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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An increase in the amount of charcoal in the bog deposits may indicate a greater frequency of naturally occurring forest fires as would be consistent with drier conditions.
The amount of charcoal in the bog deposits drops to its lowest amount in these sediments.
Stoklund's very useful paper brings together several of her separate reports on recent Danish runic finds, mostly either on brooches from burials or on weapons from bog deposits. One problem here is that of the provenance of the weapons: they are argued to have been those of defeated enemies from outside Denmark, some from Norway, others from south of the Elbe.