Bog Formation

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bog Formation

 

a soil-forming process that results in excessive wetting of soil. Bog formation starts with a change in the water and aeration budgets, an accumulation of moisture, and the development of anaerobic conditions in the soil. It is manifested by signs of gleying and by the accumulation of the semidecomposed plant residues forming peat. Bog formation may be caused by ground or slope water or by atmospheric precipitation. Bog formation is increased by man’s industrial activity. For example, the destruction of trees in the northern part of the taiga zone leads to the disruption of the water balance in the soils, the elevation of the groundwater level, and bog formation. Bog formation also results from a rise in the groundwater level after the construction of hydraulic works (along the shores of artificial seas and canals) and after unregulated irrigation. The most efficient and promising method of controlling steady bog formation is to install closed drainage. Temporary bog formation can be prevented by deep plowing and construction of temporary ditches and trenches.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, with only 24 study sites, most of which occurred within one watershed, we cautiously hypothesize there is an elevational threshold for bog formation in inland depressional wetlands that lie in a glacial landscape with groundwater that is rich in carbonates.
The bog, typical of the Raised Bog formation as defined by Costin et al.
``Should the current bureaucratic trend continue the canal will quickly degenerate into the bog formation it was before reclamation works started,'' he said.
Two related processes are responsible for bog formation: the formation of peat in the upper layer and the gleying of the lower layer.
Role of ecosystem development and climate change in bog formation in central Sweden.