Boiserie

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Related to Boiseries: wainscot

Boiserie

Wood paneling decorated with carvings in shallow relief.

boiserie

Wood paneling on interior walls, usually floor to ceiling; as a rule enriched by carving, gilding, painting, or, rarely, inlaying. Also see paneling, wainscot.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pour l'occasion, une courte biographie des parlementaires du Bas-Canada graves sur les boiseries de l'hotel du Parlement sera publiee dans une brochure.
En 2013, lors du 350e anniversaire de la creation du Conseil souverain, le nom de nouvelles figures historiques a ete sculpte dans les boiseries.
Dans les boiseries en noyer noir, des blasons heraldiques s'ajoutent lorsque les personnages commemores appartiennent a la noblesse.
Rather than the rooms being adapted to fit pre-existing spaces--as is often the case--the boiseries at the Louvre were assembled as completely as the collections allowed (panelling often having arrived in the collection incomplete), and the interior architectural spaces were adapted accordingly.
To take a particular case in point, the Salle le Bas de Montargis (1705-07) is actually made up of elements of boiseries from at least three different rooms of the former residence on the Place Vendome (Figs.
Elements are taken from Chambord, Blois, Chenonceaux and Azay-le-Rideau, while the interior is filled with the real thing: boiseries from a wide variety of Parisian hotels and elsewhere.
This took place in the state rooms of Windsor Castle, which in boiseries, furniture and ceramics embody George IV's discriminating passion for the arts of ancien regime France.
The early 20th century saw America overtake Europe as the principal market for architectural salvages, ably served by the Paris firm of Carlhian et Cie, who from 1920 to 1945 handled the bulk of the transatlantic trade in French boiseries.
Its purchase by Lord Rothschild in 2006 prevented its export, and, as he remarks, it is in every way a suitable acquisition for Waddesdon, as a French royal portrait, and a demonstration of virtuoso 18th-century carving, like the house's boiseries.
It is not known when he came to London or what he was working on between 1744 and 1753, but it is probable that his talent as a carver of boiseries was employed on other French-style interiors, such as those at Chesterfield House, Mayfair, begun in 1747 and completed in 1752, timing which dovetails perfectly with the work at Norfolk House.