Bolingbroke


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Related to Bolingbroke: Henry Bolingbroke

Bolingbroke

1. the surname of Henry IV of England
2. Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke. 1678--1751, English politician; fled to France in 1714 and acted as secretary of state to the Old Pretender; returned to England in 1723. His writings include A Dissertation on Parties (1733--34) and Idea of a Patriot King (1738)
References in periodicals archive ?
For one thing, although the word "reversion" is suggestively applied to Bolingbroke, it is hardly appropriate to describe the heir to the throne as a "reversioner." Indeed, it is doubtful that Bolingbroke is Richard's heir in the relevant sense, for "no one is the heir of a living person."(30) Further, if Richard is only a tenant for life of the Crown, Bolingbroke can be no more than this himself, in expectancy.
They are marginalized by the intrusion of the dominant social order that Bolingbroke represents into the world of the tavern and are seen as subversive to the values of the court.
Just as the King of Aram had gained his apparently superior position `by night', so Richard claims that Bolingbroke `hath revell'd in the night' (line 48).
He is insolent in his treatment of his dying uncle, John of Gaunt, and greedy in his seizure of the property of his banished cousin, Henry Bolingbroke. To his lovely young queen he gives sentimental devotion.
John, Lord Bolingbroke; it expresses a deistic philosophy (see deism ) loosely derived from Leibnitz,
A little-known part of our nation's history took place in August 1405, however, when a force of over 5000 Frenchmen landed in Milford Haven to support Owain Glyndwr in his fight against the English usurper, Henry Bolingbroke.
A concerned resident at Bolingbroke Heights, Flint, called the council to report two people had scaled scaffolding on the 15-storey block.
Andrew Charleston, 19, of Bolingbroke Street, Heaton.
She was charged with the attempted murder of her 62-year-old husband Derek at their home in Bolingbroke Heights, Flint, in the early hours of Sunday.
In the second scene of Richard II the dukes of Norfolk and Hereford - Sir Thomas Mowbray and Henry Bolingbroke - meet before the king to vindicate, by force of arms, their mutual accusations of treason.
The chapter on mirrors concentrates mostly on Richard II, especially the climactic scene where Richard asks for a mirror during his abdication, smashes it, and finds wholly different, cataclysmic meanings in the event than the more practical Bolingbroke does.