boll


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boll

the fruit of such plants as flax and cotton, consisting of a rounded capsule containing the seeds

boll

[bōl]
(botany)
A pod or capsule (pericarp), as of cotton and flax.
References in periodicals archive ?
Boll and the other five men were arrested at a Naples hotel after they all made arrangements to meet with a prostitute, who turned out to be the aforementioned undercover cop.
He said that CCRI Multan was striving hard to enable farmers cope with the future challenges well before time and added that mechanical picking of cotton and mechanical boll picking to kill pink boll-worm, it larvae and other enemy pests should be adopted by farmers.
Other notable features include: removable visor, CLICK TO FIT system, winter and summer liners, removable LED rear light, and the security and convenience of Bolls exclusive Sunglass Garage.
The previous studies reports the DCB population decline from 24 to 4 per boll after first spray and 1.
The significant impact of farm yard manure levels on boll weight was seen with respect to different tillage technologies.
1997; Linderholm, 2006) and keep boll unaffected from insects (Saeed et al.
The cotton was full of leaves, stalks and boll hulls--as it still is today--but many gins weren't yet equipped to remove that contamination, and the crop couldn't be ginned without being cleaned.
General combining ability mean squares for all the characters were significant at 5% level of probability in case of plant height and lint index, and were significant at 1% level for sympodial branches plant-1, number of bolls plant-1, boll weight, seed index and seed cotton yield plant-1.
After this the attack of spotted boll worm will be started which also effect the crop growth.
82g respectively) at 50% boll opening stage in late sown crop among all different dates of sowing.
The great genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity of the boll weevil makes it able to adapt to a wide variety of environmental conditions, allowing the expansion of its geographical distribution beyond its center of origin (Central America) (Showler, 2009).