Bolshevik


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Related to Bolshevik: Menshevik, Bolshevik Revolution

Bolshevik

(formerly) a Russian Communist
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bolshevik

(from the Russian bol' shinstovo, majority) a member of the Leninist majority of the Russian Social Democratic Party in 1903, the forerunner of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Thus, by extension, the term bolshevism has also come to refer to any revolutionary communist party which adopts a similar ‘vanguard conception’ of the role of the party in leading the working class (see also POLITICAL PARTY).

Bol’shevik

 

the southernmost and second largest island of the Severnaia Zemlia archipelago. Its area is 11,312 sq km. The northern shore is sharply indented. The land, which reaches 935 m in elevation, is mainly formed of proterozoic metamorphic schists and sandstones, as well as granitoids. Low plateau-like elevations predominate, becoming hilly plains on the southern shore. About 30 percent of the territory is covered by glaciers. On the shore plain there is moss and lichen vegetation of the arctic desert.


Bol’shevik

 

an urban-type settlement in Gomel’ Raion, Gomel’ Oblast, Byelorussian SSR, 8 km from the Kostiukovka railroad station (on theGomel’-Zhlobin line). Population, 2,500 (1968). The Bol’shevik Peat-processing Enterprise is located there.


Bol’shevik

 

an urban-type settlement in Susuman Raion, Magadan Oblast, RSFSR, on the Magadan-Khandyga highway. Population, 1,300 (1968). Gold mining.

References in periodicals archive ?
After some Jews became Bolsheviks, Europe's deep-rooted and longstanding anti-Judaism reappeared through the myth of Judeo-Bolshevism, which updated timeworn anti-Jewish stereotypes while associating Jews with Russian Bolshevism.
The questions raised by the Bolshevik revolution are fundamental issues of how to organise modern human society: i.e.
Hundred years on: Russia reckons with the Bolshevik Revolution: When the Soviet Union abruptly ended in December 1991, the term Bolshevik-used positively for much of the 20th century within the USSR-took on negative connotations in the post-Soviet period.
Vladimir Lenin, the leading Bolshevik, described Georges Danton of the French Revolution as the greatest revolutionary strategist ever, while Leon Trotsky, who created the Red Army that won the Russian Civil War, held up French revolutionary general Nicolas Carnot as his model.
It is indeed fascinating that from a Che Guevara in Cuba to a Jyoti Basu in India (Basu presided over the longest-running, democratically elected Communist government in the world), the Bolshevik Revolution inspired myriads of standard-bearers of class-struggle across continents and cultures.
Shlyapnikov was the most senior Bolshevik in Petrograd in February 1917.
Although the Bolsheviks had gained control of Russia's two largest cities, Bolshevik power remained weak throughout the collapsing Russian Empire.
In November they took up defensive positions around Dvina River and fought off a massive Bolshevik attack in which the Canadians briefly lost control of their field guns, but then managed to rally and retake them, which had until that moment been a feat that had only happened once before in British military history.
Exemplified by the Antonov rebellion in Tambov Province, these revolts have traditionally been interpreted as a direct consequence of Bolshevik policies on grain.
In this way, via a series of pragmatic decisions which 'seemed natural', the Bolshevik leaders 'ended up creating a religious space, complete with sacred relic and monumental tomb'.
The former MP for Crosby tweeted: "It's almost as if @CharlotteChurch was an overpaid bolinger bolshevik who didn't have a f*** clue #hmmm #moron."