Bolton


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Bolton

or

Bolton-le-Moors

(bōl`tən-lə-mo͝orz), metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 143,960), NW England, located in the Manchester metropolitan area. Since the late 18th cent., when spinning factories were built and a canal (1791) was constructed to Manchester, Bolton has been a cotton-textile center. Prior to that time, wool weaving, which was stimulated by the immigration of Flemings in the 14th cent., was important. Besides the textile plants (sheets, quilts, towels, bedcovers, and dress materials), factories pack poultry and produce textile and other machinery, chemicals, leather goods, furniture, carpets, and paper. Samuel CromptonCrompton, Samuel,
1753–1827, English inventor of the mule spinner, or muslin wheel, an important step in the development of fine cotton spinning. Working as a young man in a spinning mill, he knew the defects of the Hargreaves jenny and determined to produce something
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, inventor of the spinning mule (1779), was born nearby and is buried in Bolton. Richard ArkwrightArkwright, Sir Richard,
1732–92, English inventor. His construction of a machine for spinning, the water frame, patented in 1769, was an early step in the Industrial Revolution.
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 invented the "water frame" there c.1768.

Bolton

 

(Bolton-le-Moors), a city and county borough in Great Britain in Lancashire County. Population, 152,500 (1969). Bolton is a part of the Manchester conurbation and a railroad junction. It is one of the oldest (14th century) centers of the textile industry. Its principal industries are cotton manufacturing and the production of automobile and airplane parts. Bolton also has metallurgical, electronics, paper, chemicals, and garment industries.

bolton

one who flatters by pretending humility. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 343]

Bolton

1. a town in NW England, in Bolton unitary authority, Greater Manchester: centre of the woollen trade since the 14th century; later important for cotton. Pop.: 139 403 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NW England, in Greater Manchester. Pop.: 263 800 (2003 est.). Area: 140 sq. km (54 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Bolton was involved in shaping US intelligence in the run-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq and not in a good way.
As the latest developments threatened to shatter UKIP, Mr Bolton's estranged wife was said to be close to meltdown over his antics.
"There's been a couple of bad performances, certainly in defence, and that's been a rarity for Bolton under Parkinson.
Caption: Michael Bolton, Kelly Levesque, Susan Shin
And they could be dangerous opponents for Bolton, who they defeated 1-0 at London Road in November.
West was born in Concord, raised and educated in Bolton, and was a graduate of the Nashoba Regional High School, Class of 1993.
COMPLAINT Bolton with his family South Lanarkshire Council fired the social worker over the 2011 claims and this month paid a PS3000 out-of-court settlement to John.
One of the most refreshing aspects of the book is the attention Bolton gives to the cultural "underground," particularly the writer/philosopher Egon Bondy and the poet/art critic Ivan Martin Jirous, who remain cult figures among alternatively thinking Czechs and Slovaks, but are hardly known in the English-speaking world (Bolton's primary audience).
Teams tended to travel by train in those days and when the Bluebirds travelled to Bolton they would leave on Friday afternoon with 12 players, one of them a standby because there were no substitutes, several directors and local journalists from the South Wales Echo and Western Mail.
The Bolton defender steered home a rebound after Barnsley goalkeeper Luke Steele had spilled Marcos Alonso's vicious free-kick.
Bolton's Nigel Reo-Coker cancelled out a stunning strike from Luka Modric at the Reebok Stadium but three goals in nine minutes from Spurs, one from Rafael van der Vaart and two from Adebayor, ended the contest.