Bolton

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Bolton

or

Bolton-le-Moors

(bōl`tən-lə-mo͝orz), metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 143,960), NW England, located in the Manchester metropolitan area. Since the late 18th cent., when spinning factories were built and a canal (1791) was constructed to Manchester, Bolton has been a cotton-textile center. Prior to that time, wool weaving, which was stimulated by the immigration of Flemings in the 14th cent., was important. Besides the textile plants (sheets, quilts, towels, bedcovers, and dress materials), factories pack poultry and produce textile and other machinery, chemicals, leather goods, furniture, carpets, and paper. Samuel CromptonCrompton, Samuel,
1753–1827, English inventor of the mule spinner, or muslin wheel, an important step in the development of fine cotton spinning. Working as a young man in a spinning mill, he knew the defects of the Hargreaves jenny and determined to produce something
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, inventor of the spinning mule (1779), was born nearby and is buried in Bolton. Richard ArkwrightArkwright, Sir Richard,
1732–92, English inventor. His construction of a machine for spinning, the water frame, patented in 1769, was an early step in the Industrial Revolution.
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 invented the "water frame" there c.1768.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bolton

 

(Bolton-le-Moors), a city and county borough in Great Britain in Lancashire County. Population, 152,500 (1969). Bolton is a part of the Manchester conurbation and a railroad junction. It is one of the oldest (14th century) centers of the textile industry. Its principal industries are cotton manufacturing and the production of automobile and airplane parts. Bolton also has metallurgical, electronics, paper, chemicals, and garment industries.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bolton

one who flatters by pretending humility. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 343]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Bolton

1. a town in NW England, in Bolton unitary authority, Greater Manchester: centre of the woollen trade since the 14th century; later important for cotton. Pop.: 139 403 (2001)
2. a unitary authority in NW England, in Greater Manchester. Pop.: 263 800 (2003 est.). Area: 140 sq. km (54 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Bolton's glowing recommendations failed to secure immediate permanent employment for Nasatir.
So by the 1920s it would appear that Bolton supported the recruitment, training, and placement of Jews in the academy.
From that moment, Ehrman underwrote the publication costs of most of Bolton's books.
Despite his relationship with Ehrman and support for Jewish students, Bolton chaired a history department that had never hired a Jewish professor.
(28) Despite Schevill's unsupportive assessment, Bolton wrote to Kantorowicz inviting him to join the Berkeley history department as visiting professor of medieval history for the 1939-1940 academic year: "I am writing to welcome you and to make arrangements for the courses which you will give." He assigned Kantorowicz the standard course load of two undergraduate classes and one graduate seminar per semester and allowed him to suggest the particular topics for each course.
Whether Kantorowicz was hired because Sproul insisted over Bolton's objection or because Bolton privately recommended Kantorowicz remains an open question.
If Bolton objected to Kantorowicz joining the history faculty, anti-Semitism might not have been his motive.
There is one other motive that Bolton may have had.
Exposure to Kantorowicz seemed to eliminate whatever objections Bolton may have held against him.
The year after Bolton recommended Kantorowicz for a permanent faculty position, he wrote a letter of recommendation for Woodrow Borah, who wanted an assistant professorship at Tulane University.
(37) He was impressed with the magnificent architecture and the student body, who were "a healthy, happy group," he told Bolton. They were "so well trained in good diet that their instinctive tendency" was "to reach for milk," which he was surprised to find was served even at Princeton dances.
In 1946, he wrote Bolton a long letter summarizing his experiences.