escort fighter

(redirected from Bomber escort)

escort fighter

[′es‚kȯrt ‚fīd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A fighter designed or equipped for long-range missions, usually to accompany heavy bombers on raids.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During the period from June 1944 through April 1945, the 332d Fighter Group flew primarily bomber escort missions for the Fifteenth Air Force.
In 1944, the P-51 replaced its fellow Heritage Flight fighter, the P-47, as the primary bomber escort.
The unit moved to England where it transitioned to P-47 Thunderbolt aircraft, providing bomber escort support.
Joining the US Army Air Force in 1942, Gilbert was posted to a squadron stationed in southern Italy in late 1943, from where he "ew Spit-res and later Mustang ghters on bomber escort missions over Austria and southern Germany.
Joining the US Army Air Force in 1942, Gilbert was posted to a squadron stationed in southern Italy in late 1943, from where he flew Spitfires and later Mustang fighters on bomber escort missions over Austria and southern Germany.
The Supermarine Mk-1Xe fighter plane was built in the Castle Bromwich factory in December 1943 and served in North Africa, Italy, Corsica, Greece and Yugoslavia, flying 95 bomber escort missions.
Ultimately, the Mustang would emerge as the air forces' dominant fighter because engineers at North American Aviation made the field modifications needed to make it work as a long-range bomber escort before any of its competitors did likewise with their own models.
In an interview with the Ocala Star-Banner last year, he described how he had flown 250 types of planes and had a particular fondness for the P-51, which came into the war relatively late and was used as a long-range bomber escort over Europe.
The squadron moved around to RAF Gravesend, RAF Tangmere, and finally ended up at RAF Church Stanton (later renamed as RAF Culmhead), where they were assigned to provide bomber escort missions over France and Germany.
Holton told the Montgomery Advertiser that "well-meaning and highly placed speakers have beguiled audiences with the phrase 'the Tuskegee Airmen flew 200 bomber escort missions without losing a single bomber to enemy aircraft gunfire.
However, 67 Bf 110s (27 per cent of initial strength) were lost during the same six-day period, the Zerstorer proving itself incapable of performing its mission and forcing reliance on the short-ranged Bf 109E "frontal fighter" for bomber escort.