escort fighter

(redirected from Bomber escort)

escort fighter

[′es‚kȯrt ‚fīd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A fighter designed or equipped for long-range missions, usually to accompany heavy bombers on raids.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Supermarine Mk-1Xe fighter plane was built in the Castle Bromwich factory in December 1943 and served in North Africa, Italy, Corsica, Greece and Yugoslavia, flying 95 bomber escort missions.
P-38s had flown bomber escort missions, fighter sweeps, and escort to photo and weather planes.
In an interview with the Ocala Star-Banner last year, he described how he had flown 250 types of planes and had a particular fondness for the P-51, which came into the war relatively late and was used as a long-range bomber escort over Europe.
The squadron moved around to RAF Gravesend, RAF Tangmere, and finally ended up at RAF Church Stanton (later renamed as RAF Culmhead), where they were assigned to provide bomber escort missions over France and Germany.
Holton told the Montgomery Advertiser that "well-meaning and highly placed speakers have beguiled audiences with the phrase 'the Tuskegee Airmen flew 200 bomber escort missions without losing a single bomber to enemy aircraft gunfire.
Among the many accomplishments of Gomer's unit was bomber escort duty, during which they never lost a bomber to enemy fighters.
From fight engagements, to bomber escort missions, to shooting down a Zeppelin, the game provides hours of battle without the blood of many of today's hyper-violent games.
Mr Ayerst, who was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) in December 1944, flew Spitfires on intruder sorties over France before and during D-Day and on bomber escort duty against Germany's V-weapons sites and in support of mass daylight raids.
Mr Ayerst, who was awarded the A Distinguished Flying Cross in December 1944, Y=ew Spitres on intruder sorties over France before and during D-Day, on bomber escort duty against Germany's V-weapons sites and in support of weapons sites and in support of Vmass daylight raids.
A few days later on August 31 while on an bomber escort mission over France, his Spitfire R7307 was shot down by a german fighter and crashed near Le Trait, Normandy.
Haulman, chief of organizational history at the Air Force Historical Research Agency at Maxwell AFB, Alabama, focuses on the bomber escort performance of the celebrated Tuskegee Airmen.
The group was noted for its excellence in providing bomber escort service during World War II.