Bombycilla


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bombycilla

 

(waxwing), a genus of birds of the order Passeriformes. The short-legged body is 15–18 cm long and covered with soft plumage, which is brownish gray with reddish tones. There is a crest on the head. The genus includes three species, which are distributed in Northern Europe, Asia, and North America. The USSR has two species: the Bohemian waxwing (B. garrulus) and the Japanese waxwing (B. japonica). The Bohemian waxwing, an inhabitant of the northern forest zone, has a brown crest and a yellow-tipped tail. The Japanese waxwing has a red-tipped tail and an admixture of black feathers in the crest; it is found in southeast Yakutia, along the lower course of the Amur River, and in the northern Primor’e. Waxwings are migratory birds and live in flocks; they inhabit coniferous and mixed forests. The birds nest in trees. A clutch contains three to five eggs, which are incubated for 14 days. Waxwings feed on berries, small fruits, and insects. They catch insects in flight, in the same manner as flycatchers.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum).--Bombycilla cedrorum is a fairly common summer resident and sporadic breeder on the floodplain.
Common name Genus and species Canada Goose Branta canadensis Mallard Anas platyrhynchos Bufflehead Bucephala albeola Red-breasted Merganser Mergus serrator American Coot Fulica americana American Crow Corvus brachyrhynchos Cedar Waxwing Bombycilla cedrorum Northern Shrike Lanius excubitor American Tree Sparrow Spizella arborea Dark-eyed Junco Junco hyemalis Red-winged Blackbird Agelaius phoeniceus Common Grackle Quiscalus quiscula Brown-headed Cowbird Molothrus ater Common Redpoll Carduelis flammea American Goldfinch Carduelis ristis Table 2 Winter resident bird species in the Grand Calumet River corridor.
eight sites in agriculturally dominated landscapes; [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED]) for the American Robin (Turdus migratorius), Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus), Yellow Warbler (Den~ droica petechia), and Back-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), the only five open-cup nesting species that were sufficiently abundant in both treatments.
(1991) observed that merlin had the highest rate of success when hunting small birds such as sparrows (56% catches of house sparrows, Passer domesticus; 50% catches of chipping sparrows, Spizella passerina) and the lowest rate of success when hunting larger birds such as American robin (Turdus migratorius, 11%), cedar waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum), common grackle (Quiscalus quisula), and eastern kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus, 0%) during the breeding season.
-- Timing of arrival, numbers, and fruit eating habits of wintering American Robins (Turdus migratorius) and Cedar Waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) were studied during two consecutive years (1989-90, 1990-91) in the Edwards Plateau region of central Texas.
The American Robin (Turdus migratorius) and Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) are two North American migrant species with large wintering ranges with in the United States (Root 1988).
We restricted our analysis to species that swallowed, dropped and flew with seeds in their beaks and excluded species that only probed seeds (e.g., yellow-rumped warbler Dendroica caronata, cedar waxwing Bombycilla cedrorum).
To this end, we compared the nesting biology of cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) and eastern kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus).
Nutritional budgets in free flying birds: cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) feeding on Washington hawthorne fruit (Crataegus phaenopyrum).