Bombyliidae


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Related to Bombyliidae: Tephritidae, Sciomyzidae

Bombyliidae

[‚bäm·bə′lī·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The bee flies, a family of dipteran insects in the suborder Orthorrhapha.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Bombyliidae

 

(the bee flies), a family of dipterous insects of the suborder Brachycera. The body measures about 10 mm long. The wings are long; the legs are long and thin. Many Bombyliidae have a long proboscis. There are about 3,000 species; they are distributed mainly in the arid tropics and subtropics. In the USSR the Bombyliidae are especially numerous in Middle Asia. They fly well; they frequently hover over flowers and suck the nectar. The development of most Bombyliidae is characterized by hyper metamorphosis; the larvae are mobile as soon as they are hatched from the egg. The Bombyliidae mostly parasitize insects. They infest the egg sacs of the Acrididae (Systoechus, Anastoechus) and parasitize moth caterpillars or Ichneumonidae larvae. Bombylius larvae live in the nests of solitary bees.

REFERENCE

Zhizn’ zhivotnykh, vol. 3. Moscow, 1969.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Bombyliidae (Insect: Diptera) de Quilamula en el area de Reserva Sierra de Huautla, Morelos, Mexico.
Seventeen of these were common to both the Kiuic and the Tabi areas: Tabanidae, Stratiomyidae, Asilidae, Culicidae, Mycetophilidae, Tachinidae, Muscidae, Tipulidae, Anthomyiidae, Bombyliidae, Tanypezidae, Syrphidae, Sciaridae, Pipunculidae, Chironomidae, Dolichopodidae, and Conopidae.
Members of the subfamily Usiinae (Bombyliidae) are readily separated from those of closely related bombyliid subfamilies by the flagellum which has a subapical sulcus bearing a style and without dorsal or ventral prongs, and by the absence of vein M2 (i.e., with three posterior cells); furthermore, members of the genus Parageron Paramonov, 1929 are separated from those of other usiine genera by the flagellum which has the subapical sulcus containing only a style and the spine-like arista (spine-like second flagellomere) is absent or fused and bumplike on apical margin of flagellum, also by the female spermathecal reservoir which is obpyriform (Evenhuis, 1990; Greathead and Evenhuis, 2001).
Palabras Clave: Bombyliidae, Estimacion de riqueza de especies, Curvas de acumulacion de especies, Sierra de Huautla, Selva baja caducifolia.
Ashman and Stanton (1991) detected significantly higher pollen-deposition rates by Bombus bifarius than Bombyliidae. These authors also documented temporal variation in components of pollination effectiveness, as was found for pollinating moths by Pettersson (1991) and for pollinators of A.
The authors thank David Notton (BMNH), Neal Evenhuis (Bishop Museum, Hawaii, USA), curator of the USNM Bombyliidae collection, and Claudio Jose Barros de Carvalho (DZUP), for loaning us specimens of Heterostylum.
x x Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex (2) -- x Bombyliidae -- x Hesperiidae -- x other x x Total number of hours observed 66 89 Total number of visitors observed 202 206 TABLE 2.--Results of pollinator foraging on experimental randomized arrays.
Parasitism was observed in 17 cells (20.00%), of which six (7.06%) were attacked by Sarcophagidae, five (5.88%) by Bombyliidae, two (2.35%) by Chrysididae, one (1.18%) by Eulophidae and three (3.53%) by non identified parasites.
Flies of the family Bombyliidae and Syrphidae exploit flowers as a source of food.
Flies (particularly Bombyliidae) occasionally have been reported to visit cactus flowers (Johnson, 1992; McIntosh, 2005; Strong, 2005), but they have not been considered as potential pollinators most likely because they do not fit the bee-pollination syndrome proposed by earlier investigators (Grant and Grant, 1979x, 1979b; Grant and Hurd, 1979; Grant et al., 1979).
The parasitoids from the families Bombyliidae (Diptera) and Chalcididae (Hymenoptera), were identified by Carlos Jose Einicker Lamas (Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo-SP, Brazil), and Marcelo Teixeira Tavares (Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vit6ria-ES, Brazil), respectively.
1988 Bee flies and bluets: Bombylius (Diptera: Bombyliidae) flower-constant on the distylous species, Hedyotis caerulea (Rubiaceae), and the manner of foraging.