Bonapartists


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Bonapartists

 

supporters of the restoration of the Bonaparte dynasty in France after the fall of the Empire (1804–14) and the Second Empire (1852–70). During the Revolution of 1848 the Bonapartists contributed to the rise to power of Napoleon I’s nephew Prince Louis Bonaparte, who established a Bonapartist regime after the coup d’etat of Dec. 2,1851. Under the Third Republic the Bonapartists were one of the monarchist parties.

References in periodicals archive ?
The exiles received considerable attention, both from American politicians interested in territorial and economic expansion and from French officials perennially concerned about Bonapartist conspiracies.
56) Like the photography of the ruined Tuileries Palace, the novel's detailed reconstruction of the speculator's mansion infuses the decadent architecture with phantoms as if to empty out the buildings and then bar their doors to the real living Bonapartists and their supporters.
Boscher's book is organized in four major chronological sections (1792-99, 1799-1814, 1814-30 and 1830-48) and each section is subdivided, for example into Republican, royalist and/or Bonapartist political opposition, a scheme which is far more satisfactory than that of Aubert.
The Bonapartists and clericalists in the French Third Republic are good examples, along with the Ministerials in Sweden after the reform of the Riksdag in 1866.
As an outspoken Bonapartist, I had made clear in previous classes my views that Napoleon preserved the basic gains of the French Revolution.
There Dantes' incarceration was secured by the plotting of his enemies outside the prison, notably Villefort, who wished to cover up his own father's connections with the Bonapartists.
Surrounded by painters, sculptors, writers and Bonapartists near Montmartre, he drew on contemporary events and the world around him for his subjects, also creating smaller paintings and magnificent drawings.
43) The situation was taken advantage of by Bonapartists in France to justify Louis Napoleon's suppression of any free press.
He went on to rid himself of the Party of Order and destroy the Second Republic with the support of a handful of Bonapartists in the National Assembly.
Businessmen, Catholics, colonialists, foreigners, Bonapartists, women, and Jews all filed briskly past before being fixed between the cross-hairs of Mirbeau's inflammatory prose.
Returned Bourbons and Stuarts taught the people much better than Puritans, Jacobins, or Bonapartists could, that there was no way back to the past; that the basic work of the revolution was irreversible; and that it must be saved for the future:' Anyone looking at Bush, Thatcher, Kohl, Mitterrand and the others lined up behind their plexiglass must surely understand the force of that remark.