Bone Tools

Bone Tools

 

various tools made of the bones, antlers, and tusks of animals. They are known from the Paleolithic period. In the Upper Paleolithic, spearheads, dart tips, needles, chisels, awls, and daggers were made from bone; in the Neolithic, bone also came to be used for arrowheads, harpoons, fishhooks, hoes, parts of bows, and planes (tools for cleaning hides). Bone tools were also widely used in the early Iron Age, for example, among tribes of the D’iakovo culture. With the development of metal-working, bone tools were gradually replaced by metal tools. Among some peoples, especially the land and sea hunters of the North (Eskimo, Chukchi, Koriak), the use of bone tools continued until the 17th through 19th centuries.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Langley is a specialist in analysing ancient bone tools, and looked at several small bone spikes believed to have been used as spear or arrow heads.
These examples were long, narrow, bone tools with tapered ends and wide midsections with line holes.
Archaeologists recently analyzed 115,000-year-old bone tools that were discovered in China.
They used simple stone and bone tools, wore clothing, adorned their bodies and may have had a complex language.
But in Tasmania, groups of hunter-gatherers began to lose -- or failed to develop -- a wide range of useful technologies: bone tools, fitted cold-weather clothing, boomerangs, spear-throwers, and durable boats.
But in Tasmania, groups of hunter-gatherers began to lose-or failed to develop-a wide range of useful technologies: bone tools, fitted cold-weather clothing, boomerangs, spear-throwers, and durable boats.
Prehistoric antler- and bone tools from Kaposuljak-Vardomb (south-western Hungary) with special regard to the Early Bronze Age implements.--Written in Bones.
You can walk through the tunnels, and a highlight is the amazing Bronze Age cavern which was dug out more than 3,500 years ago by miners using nothing more than stone and bone tools.
The Clovis left behind stone and bone tools all over the continent, but no trace of where they came from.
21 ( ANI ): Researchers have suggested that it may have been Neandertals, and not modern humans, who made first specialized bone tools in Europe.