Bonin Islands


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Related to Bonin Islands: Ryukyu Islands, Iwo Jima

Bonin Islands

(bō`nīn), Jap. Ogasawara-gunto, volcanic island group, c.40 sq mi (100 sq km), in the W Pacific Ocean, c.500 mi (800 km) S of Tokyo; part of Tokyo prefecture, Japan. The largest and principal island is Chichi (formerly Peel Island), c.10 sq mi (30 sq km), the site of Omura, the capital of the group, and Futami-ko (Port Lloyd), the chief harbor. The principal products are timber and fruit, such as bananas and pineapples. The majority of the inhabitants are Japanese; there are some Koreans and Taiwanese. The islands were claimed by Japan from the British in 1875 and placed under the Tokyo prefecture in 1880. In World War II the islands formed a major Japanese military stronghold until they were occupied by the U.S. navy in 1945. The islands were administered by the U.S. military until 1968, when they were returned to Japan.

Bonin Islands

 

or Ogasawara, a volcanic archipelago of 89 small islands in the western Pacific Ocean. The islands extend 150 km along 142° 10’ E long, between 26° 30’ and 27° 44’N lat. The islands belong to Japan, but after World War II they were occupied by the United States. According to an agreement of Apr. 5, 1968, the islands were returned to Japan. The area of the islands is about 70 sq km and the population about 8,000. The terrain is mountainous, with peaks of extinct volcanoes up to 390 m in altitude. The climate is tropical and humid. The vegetation is tropical, and sugarcane, rice, tobacco, and coconut palms are raised.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Bonin Island chain, where both Niijima and Nishino-shima are situated comprises of 30 small islands, all of which were formed by the outburst of an ancient underwater volcano.
In November 2013, a baby volcanic island rose from the sea out of a volcanic blast in the Bonin Islands about 620 miles (1,000 kilometers) south of Tokyo, on the western edge of the Pacific "Ring of Fire," a hotbed of seismic activity.
Japan's coastguard and the country's Meteorological Agency said the islet was about 660ft in diameter and just off the coast of Nishinoshima, a small, uninhabited island in the Ogasawara chain, which is also known as the Bonin islands.
Philip Van Buskirk, a drummer on board the USS Plymouth, who first visited the Bonin Islands in 1853, kept records on the everyday life of the islanders.
According to a report in National Geographic News, taken on October 15, the image shows a female sperm whale, with a calf at her side, swimming near the surface off Japan's Bonin Islands in the northwestern Pacific, carrying the remains of a roughly 30-foot (9-meter) giant squid in her jaws.
Origin and diversification of Hibiscus glaber, species endemic to the oceanic Bonin Islands, revealed by chloroplast DNA polymorphism.
Hearn quite obviously spent considerable time researching World War II Japanese involvement in the Bonin Islands and, particularly, Chichi Jima.