Exodus

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Related to Book of Exodus: Book of Genesis, Moses

Exodus

(ĕk`sədəs), book of the Bible, 2d of the 5 books of the Law (the Pentateuch or Torah) ascribed by tradition to Moses. The book continues the story of the ancestors of Israel in Egypt, now grown in number to a large landless population enslaved by the pharaoh. Although the book describes all 12 tribes, it is much more likely that the book is based on the traditions of a group of nomadic Hebrews whose sojourn in Egypt became one of oppression and slavery. Grouped around Moses, they were freed from bondage at the Red Sea. Their saga and their Mosaic religion became the determinative feature of the great national epic that is enshrined in the Pentateuch and the historical books of the Hebrew Bible. The religious and 12-tribe political establishment of the later Temple period is read back into the Exodus narrative. The events of the book may be outlined as follows: first, the bondage in Egypt, from which God prepares liberation through the agency of Moses, including Moses' early career and vocation, and the first nine plagues of Egypt; second, the exodus proper, with the plague of the first-born and the institution of the Passover and the dry crossing through the Red Sea; third, the first divine legislation at Mt. Sinai. The last portion includes the Ten Commandments, a law code, directions for a tabernacle and worship, the designation of Aaron as high priest, the first national apostasy in worshiping the golden calf, a brief restatement of the code, and the institution of the tabernacle.

Bibliography

See studies by N. M. Sarna (1986), J. Durham (1987), and T. E. Fretheim (1991).

Exodus

Jewish captives escape Pharaoh’s bondage. [O.T.: Exodus]
See: Escape

Exodus

departure of Israelites from Egypt under Moses. [O.T.: Exodus]
See: Journey

Exodus

1. the. the departure of the Israelites from Egypt led by Moses
2. the second book of the Old Testament, recounting the events connected with this and the divine visitation of Moses at Mount Sinai

EXODUS

(database)
An extensible database project developed at the University of Wisconsin.

eXodus

(2)
A package from White Pines allowing the Macintosh to be used as an X server.
References in periodicals archive ?
After this momentous liberation of the Hebrew people, the importance of the Book of Exodus in terms of the giving of the Ten Commandments through Moses and how the people would worship the Lord is missing.
Dozemann introduces the volume with a very brief overview of the structure and thematic development of the Book of Exodus.
According to a report in The Telegraph, researchers believe they have found evidence of real natural disasters on which the ten plagues of Egypt, which led to Moses freeing the Israelites from slavery in the Book of Exodus in the Bible, were based.
As she did previously with the Book of Genesis author Veda Duff Tohline has created a marvelous collection of character studies of the personalities in the Book of Exodus.
The board makes sure the content of their drawings will not offend or corrupt the minds of young readers or violate the Biblical edict in the book of Exodus that "thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above.
Each of the predecessors were influenced by earlier styles and ostensibly, at the heart of it all, we find the biblical story itself, though we leave the exhibit wondering if we can ever read the book of Exodus again without Charlton Heston (or, possibly, Mel Brooks) as our key image of Moses.
Her more recent book, "Moses' Women" (Ktav, 2008), is a commentary based on traditional sources about the women in the book of Exodus, the second book of the Hebrew Bible.
This was done, I submit, by a prophet inspired enough to assume the mantle of Moses (critical scholars agree that Deuteronomy was written long after Moses' time), (2) The Deuteronomic writer was clearly acquainted with earlier tradition such as the Book of Exodus, but he proceeded out of a bold originality that made Deuteronomy much more than a mere "repetition of the Law" (3); it was a new shaping of Israel's traditions according to the inspiration of the prophet(s) responsible for the bulk of the book.
Fragrances are mentioned in the Book of Exodus in the Old Testament.
Just in passing, I like the full quote from the Book of Exodus which reads: "Whatever hurt is done, you shall give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, burn for burn, bruise for bruise, wound for wound.