Elimelech

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Elimelech

(ēlĭm`ēlĕk), in the Bible, Naomi's husband.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For Lori Lefkovitz, "The main metaphors in the book of Ruth are food and sex.
The Book of Ruth provides a contrast to the last two narratives in the Book of Judges.
One thing that becomes readily apparent from an assimilationist reading of the Book of Ruth is the ambiguities in character, plot, and dialogue.
Second graders studied Genesis and talk of the Shabbat and holidays; in third grade religious statutes and prophets were added; and in fourth grade pupils studies the interpretations of Rashi (Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki), the book of Ruth and physical and historical geographies of the land of Israel.
The source of these discipleship tools is a Biblical saint whose name is Ruth from the Old Testament Book of Ruth. Ruth's story with a supporting cast of Naomi and Boaz exemplify the promises and Truth contained in the Word of God.
Synopsis: The Book of Ruth, with its focus on the exemplary behavior of Ruth and Boaz, stands at the crossroads between society s downward trajectory during the era of the Judges and its ascent during the era of the monarchy.
Interspersed among these chapters are "agricultural interludes" exploring the book of Ruth's most central and most overlooked relationship: the one between the characters and their food.
Last year Ilse had a book of Ruth's poems published, titled A Magic Presence.
By sleuthing linguistic differences and similarities in the book of Ruth, T.
Bethlehem is also the setting for the Book of Ruth, and is King David's hometown, the most celebrated king in Jewish history.
The Book of Ruth is the shortest book in the entire Old Testament, yet its very brevity is its beauty.