Elimelech

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Elimelech

(ēlĭm`ēlĕk), in the Bible, Naomi's husband.
References in periodicals archive ?
This essay offers a brief reading of the Book of Ruth through the lens of assimilation theory.
Eskenazi describes the Book of Ruth as a "story [that] is simple but never simplistic" (p.
I extend my discussion of the parallels between Agaat and the Book of Ruth to an application of Marcella Althaus-Reid's radical concept of the Bi/Christ, which provides a challenge to the use of heteropatriarchy and other binaries in the Christian religion.
He has made that easy for the reader by including among the appendices a synopsis of the Book of Ruth in its Syriac, "literal" Arabic, and "idiomatic" Arabic garb, in three columns.
The strength and clarity of the first-person narrator's voice, so thrilling in Hamilton's The Book of Ruth, appears muted with age--both the author's and the character's--or perhaps Mac's equanimity makes him too gray a storyteller to favor.
It is also a so-called "he" Bible that mistakenly refers to Ruth, in the Book of Ruth, as "he," an error that was corrected in some subsequent editions.
Through explanation of the Book of Ruth and description of the use of the Bible in the movie, the reader can see that Fried Green Tomatoes is modeled after the theme of female friendship in Ruth.
While notable for the active women it portrays, the Book of Ruth does not break with the tradition of patriarchy.
Cheryl Exum analyzes various visual interpretations of the Book of Ruth, such as Philip Hermogenes Calderon's painting Ruth and Naomi and the films The Story of Ruth by Henry Koster and Naomi and Her Two Daughters-in-Law by William Blake.
Instead, he wants readers to relish possibilities for counterbalancing the androcentrism of patriarchy within the canon by recognizing and valuing the female voice as exemplified in the Book of Ruth (chap.
The Book of Ruth is a simple tale, of a world where there are no 'baddies'.