Boon

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Boon

 

the woody part of stalks, obtained as by-products in the primary processing (braking and scutching) of fiber plants, such as flax, hemp, kenaf, dogbane, and ramie, to free the fibers from the stock. Boon, which makes up 65–70 percent of the mass of a bast stalk, consists principally of cellulose (45–58 percent), lignin (21–29 percent), and pentosans (23–26 percent). Structural and insulation slabs, pulp, and paper are manufactured from boon.

References in periodicals archive ?
If the last few years are on an uptick in Booner bucks taken, then I'm on to something.
In Chester County, Pennsylvania, where I often hunt, there have been three Booners recorded in the last 15 years.
On the other hand, if Baby Booner becomes "Mature Booner," and another bowhunter has the great fortune to tag their buck of a lifetime, I would feel quite proud that I let him live when he was just an average deer.
As the week progressed, I spent the majority of my time in the Booner stand.
Ten years have passed since harvesting that nine-pointer, and what I've learned in that time about chasing Booners would take a lot of paper, but I'm going to try to cover some basic tactics and facts that could help you take your dream buck.
No offense to traditional archery targets, but once you've tried the Booner Buck, you'll never go back.
When Rob Evans showed me photos of the Booner he took in Manitoba with Jamie Balan of E & D Outfitters the previous year, I jumped at the chance to bowhunt there.
At a time when increasing hunter recruitment is critical to our sport's future, Hunter Dan has hit a home run with their new Booner and Hottie compound bow sets.
It was the rut in Wisconsin, and the best chance to kill a Booner only comes around once a year.
all those thoughts were quickly whisked away when I saw a Booner chasing a hot doe
Jason gets his elk, a gorgeous six-by-six as big as anything he's taken to date, but not the Booner he's hung his hopes on.
As a result, states that never produced more than the occasional Booner are starting to produce more trophy-class whitetails than ever.