Boothia Peninsula

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Boothia Peninsula

(bo͞o`thēə), 12,483 sq mi (32,331 sq km), Nunavut Territory, Canada; the northernmost (71°58'N) tip of the North American mainland. It is almost an island, being connected with the mainland only by the narrow Isthmus of Boothia. Topographically and in climate it is like the islands of the Arctic ArchipelagoArctic Archipelago
, group of more than 50 large islands, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, N Canada, in the Arctic Ocean. The southernmost members of the group include Baffin (the archipelago's largest island), Victoria, Banks, Prince of Wales, and Somerset islands; N of
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. A narrow strait separates it in the north from Somerset Island. To the east the Gulf of Boothia separates it from Baffin Island. It is virtually uninhabited except for a few hundred settlers at Spence Bay and Thom Bay. The peninsula was discovered and explored (1829–33) by John RossRoss, Sir John,
1777–1856, British arctic explorer and rear admiral. In 1818 he went in search of the Northwest Passage but turned back after exploring Baffin Bay.
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, the British explorer, and named for a patron of the expedition, Sir Felix Booth. Near the southwest end the expedition of Sir John FranklinFranklin, Sir John,
1786–1847, British explorer in N Canada whose disappearance caused a widespread search of the Arctic. Entering the navy in 1801, he fought in the battle of Trafalgar.
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, the British explorer, ended in tragedy. Roald AmundsenAmundsen, Roald
(Roald Engelbregt Grauning Amundsen) , 1872–1928, Norwegian polar explorer; the first person to reach the South Pole. He served (1897–99) as first mate on the Belgica
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, a Norwegian, explored the peninsula in 1903–5.

Boothia Peninsula

a peninsula of N Canada: the northernmost part of the mainland of North America, lying west of the Gulf of Boothia, an arm of the Arctic Ocean
References in periodicals archive ?
Peary caribou have been found on KWI as well as on the northern part of the Boothia Peninsula and Victoria Island (WKSS, 2008) (Fig.
The portion of the route over northern Canada and the Boothia Peninsula is the most difficult because of icing issues, so further studies are continuing in those areas, Pfeffer says.
Concentrations of seismicity near Baffin Island and across the Boothia and Ungava peninsulas may be caused by postglacial rebound (Adams and Basham 1991).
In her introduction, Eber notes that a disproportionate number understandably pertain to the expeditions that had the most interaction with Inuit: William Edward Parry's second voyage 1821-23 (to Igloolik), John Ross's second voyage 1829-33 (to the area of Thom Bay, halfway down the east coast of Boothia Peninsula), and Roald Amundsen's successful voyage in a fishing smack through the northwest passage 1903-6 (including his two winters on King William Island at what became the village of Gjoa Haven).
The first explorers to find the north magnetic pole did so at Cape Adelaide, on the west coast of Canada's Boothia Peninsula, in 1831.
One morning in August 1999, on the west coast of Boothia Peninsula in the high Arctic, three men prepared to set out from a rough camp to honour the explorer John Rae.
While travelling on the Boothia Peninsula, an explorer named John Rae met some Inuit.
When James Ross became the first person to reach the North Magnetic Pole in 1831, it lay in the strait that now bears his name, just off the coast of Canada's Boothia Peninsula.
Led by former marine Dom Mee the seven faced hazards including pack ice and polar bears on their trip across Canada's Boothia Peninsula, following the route taken in 1829 by Sir John Ross.
British explorer Sir John Ross, visiting an Eskimo encampment on Boothia Peninsula, Jan.
From west to east they include the Inuvialuit of the Mackenzie River Delta; the Copper Inuit of Coronation Gulf; the Netsilik Inuit of Boothia Peninsula and surrounding area; the Iglulik Inuit of Melville Peninsula and northern Baffin Island; the Caribou Inuit of the interior of the west coast of Hudson Bay; the Baffinland Inuit of south-central Baffin Island; the Nunavik Inuit, who occupy the south shore of Hudson Strait, the east coast of Hudson Bay and the interior of northern Quebec; and the Labrador Inuit (Figure 1).
This expedition was to complete the work of Franklin by mapping the two sections of Arctic coastline Franklin and others had not--from the mouth of the Mackenzie River west to Point Barrow and from the mouth of the Coppermine River east to the base of the Boothia Peninsula.