Boredom


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Boredom

See also Futility.
Aldegonde, Lord St.
bored nobleman, empty of pursuits. [Br. Lit.: Lothair]
Baudelaire, Charles
(1821–1867) French poet whose dissipated lifestyle led to inner despair. [Fr. Lit.: NCE, 248]
Bovary, Emma
housewife suffers from ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary]
Des Esseintes, Jean
in dissipation and isolation, develops morbid ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Against the Grain]
Harthouse, James
thorough gentleman, weary of everything. [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
Oblomov, Ilya
Russian landowner; embodiment of physical and mental sloth. [Russ. Lit.: Oblomov]
Povey, Constance Baines
uneventful thoughts, marriage best described as routine. [Br. Lit.: The Old Wives’ Tale, Magill I, 684–686]
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Belton, who is an expert in the impact of emotions on behaviour and learning, said boredom could be an 'uncomfortable feeling' and that society had 'developed an expectation of being constantly occupied and constantly stimulated'.
The psychologist has worked with the airline to create the Child Boredom Quotient (CBQ), helping parents identify the exact moment their kids will get bored so they can enjoy stress-free travel.
Workplace boredom is often defined as "an unpleasant, transient affective state in which the individual feels a pervasive lack of interest in and difficulty concentrating on the current activity" (Game, 2007: 702).
As reported in Time to Play, parents' runaway top choice for how their child would ideally spend their free time is playing outside -- often a natural boredom buster.
A dog's sense of smell is one of his strongest senses and using his nose can be quite tiring as well as a lot of fun for him - so scent tracking games are very good to prevent boredom.
The bookAEs many brief chapters explore themes of addiction, boredom, and distraction, as well as prayer and awareness.
Estan midiendo la misma experiencia en el trabajo la EAL y la Dutch Boredom Scale (DUBS)?
Proneness to boredom, assessed with the boredom proneness scale (BPS), has also been found to be negatively correlated with the need for cognition, high academic achievement, and satisfaction with life (Farmer & Sundberg, 1986; Seib & Vodanovich, 1998; Harris, 2000; Watt, 1994).
However, they also gave themselves 10 times more shocks (and more intense shocks) while watching the boring scene, suggesting that people will go to great lengths to alleviate boredom.
However, there have been few studies conducted in which the relationship between peer-related matters and other factors such as leisure boredom have been examined.
Deon Ashley Aston, a third-year student at Glyndwr University in Wrexham, is exploring why people become bored, what different types of boredom there are and how it can impact on different situations.