Boredom

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Boredom

See also Futility.
Aldegonde, Lord St.
bored nobleman, empty of pursuits. [Br. Lit.: Lothair]
Baudelaire, Charles
(1821–1867) French poet whose dissipated lifestyle led to inner despair. [Fr. Lit.: NCE, 248]
Bovary, Emma
housewife suffers from ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary]
Des Esseintes, Jean
in dissipation and isolation, develops morbid ennui. [Fr. Lit.: Against the Grain]
Harthouse, James
thorough gentleman, weary of everything. [Br. Lit.: Hard Times]
Oblomov, Ilya
Russian landowner; embodiment of physical and mental sloth. [Russ. Lit.: Oblomov]
Povey, Constance Baines
uneventful thoughts, marriage best described as routine. [Br. Lit.: The Old Wives’ Tale, Magill I, 684–686]
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly, Wallace's exploration of boredom is more nuanced, in its fashion, than is Kuhn's.
In The Pale King, Wallace's notion of boredom is much more in line with contemporary theorists' views in showing a careful consideration of the concept's linguistic and historical realities.
Garrity's stress on the linguistic creation of boredom, for example, clearly echoes Spacks's request that her readers "conceive boredom as an invention, an idea that became both useful and necessary only at a relatively recent historical moment" and to wonder "[w]hat social and psychological conditions would require the construction of boredom as a concept?
Spacks also offers several conditions, what Garrity calls "cultural pressure," that necessitated the invention of boredom at the advent of modernity.
It is important to emphasize that Wallace wants to look at boredom as a particular type of discourse in The Pale King because this point can easily be passed over by merely translating the thematic of boredom into the thematic of existential angst or depression.
The temptation to equate boredom with depression lingers, however, and is evidence of the continuing influence of Infinite Jest on Wallace's work.
But while The Pale King still gives credence to the existential horror of existence, which may or may not be linked to clinical depression, (4) the novel is more interested in setting this kind of boredom in a revealing context.