Borodino


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Borodino

(bərədyĭnô`), village, central European Russia, c.70 mi (110 km) W of Moscow. It was the site, on Sept. 7, 1812, of a battle between Napoleon's Grande Armée and Gen. Mikhail Kutuzov's Russian forces defending Moscow. The battle, which cost some 108,000 casualties, is described in Tolstoy's War and Peace. Napoleon entered Moscow on Sept. 14 after severely battering but not totally defeating the Russians.

Borodino

 

a village in Moscow Oblast, 124 km west of Moscow and 12 km west of Mozhaisk, on the Kolocha River (tributary of the Moskva River). The Battle of Borodino of 1812 was fought in the area of this village on Aug. 26 (Sept. 7) between Russian and Napoleonic troops. In 1941 the Borodino area was the site of sustained battles between Soviet and fascist German troops in the course of the Battle of Moscow of 1941–42. To the south of Borodino there is the Borodino military and historical museum and preserve (founded in 1903), and on the battlefield of Borodino there are a great number of monuments (to M. I. Kutuzov, P. I. Bagration, M. B. Barclay de Tolly; to units that fought in the battle; and to Soviet soldiers who died in 1941).


Borodino

 

an urban-type settlement in Krasnoiarsk Krai, RSFSR. Located 16 km southeast of the Zaozernaia railroad station (on the line from Krasnoiarsk to Taishet). Population, 10,200 (1968). The settlement was formed in 1949 after the construction of the Irsha-Borodino coal pit. Its major industries are the mining of brown coal and the processing of mica. There is a medical school and a folk theater.


Borodino

 

an urban-type settlement in Tarutino Raion, Odessa Oblast, Ukrainian SSR. Located 12 km from the Berezino railroad station (on the line from Artsiz to Bessarabia). Population, 2,500 (1968). Borodino has food-processing industries (a food combine and other enterprises). The settlement was founded in the 19th century and was named after the victory of Borodino near Moscow in 1812.

Borodino

a village in E central Russia, about 110 km (70 miles) west of Moscow: scene of a battle (1812) in which Napoleon defeated the Russians but irreparably weakened his army
References in periodicals archive ?
"Whether it is strutting generals, posturing aristocrats or the sycophantic Monsieur Berthier trying to serve Napoleon's lunch in the middle of the battle of Borodino, Prokofiev finds just the right note of sardonic humour."
El plan de golpear al Ejercito Rojo y a la Union de Republicas Socialistas Sovieticas (1922-1991) en los meses de verano y otono de 1941 fallo, afirmo el tambien especialista del museo Panorama de la Batalla de Borodino.
In which war did the Battle of Borodino take place?
According to the author, "Epistemology suffered a concussion at Austerlitz, at Wagram, at Borodino," and what follows in his study is a series of new models of knowledge designed to manage the new state of war (5).
When a farm next to his step-sister's farm near Borodino came up for sale around 1920, he bought the place and became a farmer.
Las vidas de los tres y sus familias --personajes ficticios--se entrecruzaran de diversas e insospechadas maneras a lo largo de la historia, al tiempo que se van sucediendo hechos historicos, como la batalla de Austerlitz y la de Borodino.
When Napoleon in 1812 had defeated all his European enemies (less Spain) in his quest to conquer feudal Europe, it was Russia that defeated the all conquering revolutionary French Army at Borodino and sent it packing from Moscow in 1812.
Scenes re-enacting the Battle of Borodino for tomorrow's BBC hit War and Peace are the most realistic ever created for TV.
I was more interested to know in what way and under the influence of what feelings one soldier kills another than to know how the armies were arranged at Austerlitz and Borodino." The situation is far more dreadful now.
If ever a work was written for a large-scale orchestra, it was Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, his story in music of that year's Battle of Borodino when the Russian army and wintry weather defeated Napoleon's invading forces.
Lord Rothschild's "blood on the street" value argument holds true for Borodino and Sberbank.