boron-10

boron-10

[′bȯ‚rän ′ten]
(nuclear physics)
A nonradioactive isotope of boron with a mass number of 10; it is a good absorber for slow neutrons, simultaneously emitting high-energy alpha particles, and is used as a radiation shield in Geiger counters.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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BNCT treatment produces radiation inside a tumor using boron-10 and thermal neutrons.
The Brightsen Model predicts that the large cross section of Boron-10 (as opposed to the small cross section of Boron-11) results from the presence of a stable and independent nucleon cluster structure [PNP], which coexists with two [NP] and one [NPN] clusters that maintain very small cross sections.
With the use of Boron-10 coated collimators one can reduce this component considerably.
Collisions of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen nuclei with high-speed protons would produce twice the measured ratio of boron to beryllium and only half the ratio of the isotope boron-11 to boron-10, a sibling with one fewer neutron.
Federman of the University of Toledo in Ohio and his colleagues, including Lambert, used the Goddard spectrograph to measure the relative abundances of boron-10 and boron-11 along the line of sight to three stars in the nearby interstellar medium.
The researchers conclude that the interstellar medium in Earth's neighborhood contains four times as much boron-11 as boron-10. That value, Federman adds, is similar to the ratio previously found in meteorites, which date from the formation of the solar system 4.5 billion years ago.
The collisions would produce twice the measured ratio of boron to beryllium and only half the observed abundance of boron-11 to boron-10.
Kahl and his colleagues at the University of California, San Francisco, deeloped the molecular "package bomb" as a 20-sided solid with one atom of boron-10 -- a neutron-absorbing isotope of boron--at each of the molecule's 12 corners.