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inn,

in Great Britain, any hotel, public house, tavern, or coffeehouse where lodging is provided. In American usage, the inn is generally a small rural lodging house for transients. Among the earliest public houses were empty huts placed at caravan stops in the Middle East for the shelter of traders and travelers. To pilgrims, temples and religious houses gave rest and refreshment—a custom that still lingers in some Alpine hospices. The Romans maintained post stations on their great highways for the use of messengers of state and those especially privileged. For the accommodation of ordinary transients, stabularia were kept for man and beast. In the Middle Ages hospitality was observed as one of the Christian duties by the establishment of hospices in cities and by the entertainment of travelers at monasteries. Inns kept for profit appeared in Europe about the 15th cent. and gained a reputable standing in England, often being named for the powerful family on whose holdings they were established. They were usually built around a courtyard, approached by a wide, covered entry. In America, colonial inns similar to the English hostelries sprang up along the great turnpikes.

Bibliography

See W. C. Firebaugh, Inns of the Middle Ages (1924); H. A. Monckton, A History of the English Public House (1969).


Inn

(ĭn), river, c.320 mi (515 km) long, rising near the Lake of Sils, SE Switzerland. It flows NE through the Engadine valley, then through W Austria, past Innsbruck and Solbad Hall (the head of navigation), and into S central Germany. The Inn forms part of the German–Austrian border before entering the Danube River at Passau. There are more than 20 hydroelectric power plants on the river's swift-flowing stream.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Inn

A place which provides eating and drinking, but not lodging, for the public; a tavern.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

inn

1. A place which provides eating and drinking, but no lodging, for the public; a tavern.
2. A hotel.
3. A student hostel or residence.
4. A hospice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

inn

1. a pub or small hotel providing food and accommodation
2. (formerly, in England) a college or hall of residence for students, esp of law, now only in the names of such institutions as the Inns of Court

Inn

a river in central Europe, rising in Switzerland in Graub?nden and flowing northeast through Austria and Bavaria to join the River Danube at Passau: forms part of the border between Austria and Germany. Length: 514 km (319 miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

INN

(InterNet News) A complete Usenet system written by Rich Salz that includes an NNTP server and components for newsreading. INN is available from the Internet Systems Consortium (www.isc.org). See Usenet and ISC.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
C, Protein levels of SKP2 and p27 in U266 and RPMI 8226 cells treated with 25 [micro]M of SKPin C1 or 25 [micro]M of bortezomib, or transfected with the siRNA that targeted SkP2.
The use of bortezomib strongly suggested the beneficial effect on the response and prognosis for patients with IgA type MM.
Bortezomib with or without dexamethasone in primary systemic (light chain) amyloidosis.
Most of the adverse effects associated with bortezomib are mild to moderate and are generally manageable, including gastrointestinal symptoms, peripheral neuropathy, and thrombocytopenia [1].
Daratumumab was combined with bortezomib and high-dose corticosteroids and the patient had 3 times intrathecal triplet chemotherapy treatment as well.
Ixazomib (MLN2238) is a next-generation proteasome inhibitor that has replaced bortezomib in the clinic for multiple myeloma due to its improved activity and other characteristics, such as oral bioavailability [11, 12].
The patients were treated with the following chemotherapy protocols: Doxorubicin-Vincristine-Dexasone (VAD), Melphalan-Pronison (MP), Cy-clophosphamide-Thalidomide-Dexasone (CTD), Thalidomide-Doxorubicin-Dexasone (TAD) and protocols with Bortezomib. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) was done in 45 patients (60%), of which primary in 65%, "tandem" in 25%, and secondary in 10% patients.
With the introduction of bortezomib in clinical practice, it was proven that proteasome inhibition not only suppresses bone resorption but also affects positively osteoblast function (8).
Here, we report on the long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with bortezomib, high-dose IVIG, and PPH (group BHP).
Proteosome inhibitors (e.g., Bortezomib) are not mentioned in the guidelines which suggests they do not require antiviral prophylaxis.
Soumerai et al., "Primary therapy of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia with bortezomib, dexamethasone, and rituximab: WMCTG clinical trial 05-180," Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol.