Bose Gas


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Bose gas

[′bōz ‚gas]
(statistical mechanics)
An assemblage of noninteracting or weakly interacting bosons.

Bose Gas

 

a gas formed of noninteracting particles with zero or integral spin, obeying Bose-Einstein statistics. Bose gases include the gas of photons, as well as the gas of quasi-particles (with integral spin).

References in periodicals archive ?
The Bose gas is of fundamental significance as a quintessential example of a quantum fluid.
This combined effort resulted in the conceptualisation of a Bose gas.
They cover experimental methods of ultracold atomic physics, theory and experiment with Bose gas, experiment and theory with the Fermi gases and superfluids, low-dimensional atomic Bose gases, ultracold atoms and molecules in optical lattices, unitary Fermi gases, and potential insights into non-equilibrium behavior from atomic physics.
Further, we present a new model for description of charged Bose or Fermi liquid via a nonideal Bose gas consisting of charged sound particles.
In fact, the Hamiltonian of system (24) describes an ideal Bose gas consisting of charged spinless phonons at a small wave number k [much less than] 2m[upsilon]/h but at k [much greater than] 2m[upsilon]/h the Hamiltonian operator describes an ideal gas of charged sound particles.
Here we propose a comprehensive study of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium many-body phenomena in a homogeneous 39K Bose gas with dynamically tuneable interactions.
The outstanding problems we will address range from the 50-year-old equilibrium problem of the critical temperature of an interacting homogeneous gas, to the modern topics of quenches and non-equilibrium (Kibble-Zurek and beyond) critical dynamics, to the largely unexplored problem of the unitary Bose gas.
of Parma, Italy) examines the elementary excitations in magnetic periodic structures, the spin waves or magnons, which are shown to behave like an ideal Bose gas at low temperature and an interacting Bose system at higher temperature.
The motion of "solid particle" describes the longitudinal elastic wave which in turn represents a Bose gas of neutral sound particles with spin 1 with finite mass m.
In this context, the classical Maxwell equations lead to appearance of the so-called ultraviolet catastrophe; to remove this problem, Planck proposed the model of the electromagnetic field as an ideal Bose gas of massless photons with spin one.
In 1938, the connection between the ideal Bose gas and superfluidity in helium was first made by London [1].
In this context, the classic Maxwell equations lead to appearance of the so-called ultraviolet catastrophe; to remove this problem, Planck proposed modelled the electromagnetic field as an ideal Bose gas of massless photons with spin one.