Bose-Einstein Distribution

Bose-Einstein distribution

[¦bōz ¦īn‚stīn dis·trə′byü·shən]
(statistical mechanics)
For an assembly of independent bosons, such as photons or helium atoms of mass number 4, a function that specifies the number of particles in each of the allowed energy states. Also known as Bose distribution.

Bose-Einstein Distribution

 

a formula that describes the energy-level distribution of identical particles with zero or integral spin under the condition that the interaction of the particles in the system is weak and can be disregarded. A particular case of the Bose-Einstein distribution is the Planck formula for photons (quanta of electromagnetic radiation) that have zero mass and spin 1.

References in periodicals archive ?
One may argue that the table is not fitted correctly as it is fitted with Bose-Einstein distribution factor [e.sup.A/4] - 1 while the table should be fitted with the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution factor [e.sup.A/4] if author's earlier work [11] is correct.
In Figures 5 and 6, we show a comparison of all three energy distributions for temperatures of 6000 K and 15 x [10.sup.6] K (the Bose-Einstein distribution for massless bosons is included for comparison).
The Bose-Einstein Distributions for Massive and Massless Bosons.
Thus, unlike the situation for Boltzmann and Bose-Einstein distributions, one would expect the distributions of diversity for fermions such as electrons to be dependent on temperature.
With regard to the quantum statistics of the microparticles in analytical form have been received [f.sub.B] distribution functions of bosons (Bose gases) for energy, which in quantum physics became known as the Bose-Einstein distribution functions [4, 7, 17].
One of us (MMF) has recently made an attempt [4] to evaluate the partition function of photon gas with a correct distribution function, that is, Bose-Einstein distribution function just as in [2].
Although a correct distribution function, i.e., Bose-Einstein distribution, was taken instead of Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in our study [4], the change of the upper limit of integration with respect to this variable shift was not mistakenly taken into account.
[25] but of course with the correct distribution, that is, Bose-Einstein distribution. It would be very intriguing to check if the entropy bound is still present in the photon thermodynamics in such noncommutative spacetime, while using the Bose-Einstein distribution to solve the partition function.
The only difference is that we are going to employ Bose-Einstein distribution function to solve the partition function for photon gas.
But if one employs the correct distribution (Bose-Einstein distribution) the entropy of the photon gas is not bounded (Figure 3), just like the SR.
Considering the standard Fermi-Dirac distribution and the standard Bose-Einstein distribution, we uniformly have the three standard distributions to be
For a given system, the present work shows that the temperature found from Boltzmann distribution is smaller when compared with that from Bose-Einstein distribution and is larger when compared with those from other distributions.