Moonwort

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Moonwort

 

(Botrychium lunaria), a small fern (height, 5–30 cm) of the family Ophioglossaceae. The moonwort grows in meadows, thickets, and cut forests in Eurasia, America, Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Botrychium virginianum (L.) Sw.; Rattlesnake fern, Virginia grapefern; Upland woods; Abundant and widespread; C = 4; BSUH 17757.
pycnocarpa (rock cress), Botrychium virginicum (rattlesnake fern), Bromus ciliatus (fringed brome), Bromus latiglumis (ear-leaved brome), Carex grisea (inflated narrow leaf sedge), Carex leavenworthii (Leavenworth sedge), Carex molesta (troublesome sedge), Elymus villosus (hairy wild rye), and Ulmus rubra (slippery elm).
The shoot of Botrychium interpreted as a series of dichotomies.
Electron microscopic investigation of the coating found on torus-bearing pit membranes of Botrychium dissectum, the common grape fern.
Koch BESC 86 40 0 0 0 0 0 Botrychium biternatum (Savig.) Underw.
auerswaldii y Veronica mampodrensis + en 1 y 7; Botrychium lunaria + en 3 y 9; Sempervivum vicentei subsp.
6.8 15.8 5.5 Kentucky coffee, Gymnocladus dioca 3.4 trace trace Yellow harlequin, Corydalis flavula 3.4 1.3 2.2 Fescue, Festuca arundinacea 3.4 trace trace Rattlesnake fern, Botrychium virginianum 2.5 trace trace Chickweed, Stellaria media 2.5 trace trace Crabgrass, Digitaria sanguinalis 2.5 0.6 1.4 Sedges, Carex spp.
Changes to the forest floor caused by earthworms affect vegetation, and at least one plant species, the goblin fern (Botrychium mormo), is faced with extinction due to changes caused primarily by the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus (Gundale, 2002).
Botrychium Sw., 1801.--Validated by a description in
Members of Ophioglossales and Polypodiales belong to the division Polypodiophyta and are often called "true ferns." The order Ophioglossales in Alabama include the adder's-tongue ferns (Ophioglossum) and grapeferns (Botrychium).