bottleneck

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bottleneck

a narrow stretch of road or a junction at which traffic is or may be held up
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

What does it mean when you dream about a bottleneck?

A bottleneck may mean the dreamer is squeezing through a tight situation.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

bottleneck

[′bäd·əl‚nek]
(petroleum engineering)
A section of reduced diameter in a drill pipe that is caused by excessive longitudinal strain or a combination of such strain and irregular swaying of the mechanism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bottleneck

A lessening of throughput. It often refers to networks that are overloaded, which is caused by the inability of the hardware and transmission channels to support the traffic. It can also refer to a mismatch inside the computer where slower-speed peripheral buses and devices prevent the CPU from being used to its fullest capacity.
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References in periodicals archive ?
His study revealed that out-of-round holes in the code tube headers created a "snowball" bottleneck effect downstream in the section assembly department--excessive rolling-in time, leakers to fix, hydrostatic tests to conduct and repeat.
There might have been even more but for the small-shop bottleneck effect: As Judd's work came to be more and more concentrated with a single mechanic (working in a roped-off "Judd area" of a larger business that made other products), shifting that worker away from new production to restoration work brought new production to a halt.
(17) This limited genetic diversity is widely interpreted as the result of a bottleneck effect in which the founding Asian groups that crossed the Bering land bridge possessed limited genetic diversity.
He added: "Options include extending the use of marker-poles behind the start line and basic things such as widening some of the gaps through which the horses come on to the track before starting, to avoid the bottleneck effect which sometimes results in a rush for the tape before the starter is ready to let the runners go."