Benthic Zone

(redirected from Bottom-dwelling)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Benthic Zone

 

a watery region settled by organisms dwelling on or in the bottom soil of a body of water. In bodies of salt water and fresh water, the benthic zone is subdivided into different vertical zones.

References in periodicals archive ?
The bottom-dwelling and weed-haunting Chydorids can push themselves through tangled algae and debris with the help of these claws.
Moyes added Richard Wright, Li Tie and Joseph Yobo to his squad - plus a promising young buck from the Academy - and soared from bottom-dwelling mediocrity to seventh.
Tunas appear to be more closely related to the small, sedentary seahorses, whereas marlins are close relatives of flatfishes, which are bottom-dwelling and have distinctive asymmetric heads.
Octopi and crabs took up about half as much plutonium as clams, but about 100 times more than bottom-dwelling fish.
The lively presentation of the book and the intriguingly zany chapter headings 'A bottom-dwelling scum sucker', 'Straightjackets-R-Us', really invite the reader into Ishmael's world.
The group adds that contaminated sediments are carried long distances by currents and can kill important small bottom-dwelling creatures at the bottom of the marine food chain.
then the wipe the In fact I'd rather swallow the civets whole excrescence raw than to break bread with Rupert Murdoch and his cut-throat, bottom-dwelling reptiles any day of the week.
Gulf sturgeon are anadromous fish, spending winter months in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico where they grow and increase their condition by feeding on tiny, bottom-dwelling invertebrates.
In this case, bacteria, algae, and bottom-dwelling marine species have been targeted by MabCent researchers hunting for molecular extracts that may yield medicinal benefits.
They also found that some BMAA accumulates in bottom-dwelling fish as well as in mussels and oysters cultivated on the coast of Sweden.
The target species are usually shrimp or bottom-dwelling flat-fish such as plaice and sole, but its indiscriminate nature means that hundreds of other species, including corals and seafans, are killed in the process.
The risks will persist as toxic substances enter food webs--for instance, when bottom-dwelling organisms process sediment, end then are eaten by foraging predators--or are re-released from sediments via disturbances, including storms.