boundary marker


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boundary marker

[′bau̇n·drē ‚mär·kər]
(navigation)
A radio transmitter operating at 75 megahertz and installed near the approach end of landing runway (3.9 nautical miles ± 1000 feet, or 7123 ± 305 meters) and approximately on the localizer course line.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Boundary marker

May consist of a wooden stake, surveyor’s marker, or monument located at the points where the perimeter changes directions, as indicated on a plot
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

boundary marker

A marker or inscribed stone that designates some type of boundary; for example, see meridian stone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

boundary marker

boundary marker
A painted object, such as a cone, disc, or other devices, used to mark the boundary of the surface usable for landing and takeoff of aircraft. The landing area may not have any boundary lights.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Pages 32 and 33: Based on its location, and the intersection of four fence lines near the oak, the La Belle Colline Oak was probably used as a boundary marker years ago to designate where one property line ended and another began.
The boundary marker touches 100m square of the wicket and not much shorter when hitting straight down the ground.
However, the first boundary marker in this agreement was placed in exactly the same location as point 1 in the Lebanon-Cyprus EEZ agreement.
"This fence is a boundary marker and is therefore not just there to purely act as a barrier.
Among the contexts they explore are 19th-century Catholic France, the reformer and legislator seen by French Protestants, Hungarian religion, a marginalized memory in Germany, missionary memory and Chinese Protestant identity, Calvin as a negative boundary marker in American Lutheran self-identity 1871-1934, his image within Mormonism, and Mark Twain's burlesque of him as The French Barber.
The auction has been temporarily suspended because the lighthouse serves as a boundary marker for a restricted area as defined by the Navy, and additional deed restrictions might be required.Point No Point is one of 30 Chesapeake Bay lighthouses that the federal government is selling.
Interpreting the Grianan of Aileach as a product of shifting territorial boundaries, Lacey suggests a specific context for its construction in the late eighth or early ninth century as a conspicuous boundary marker for the newly enlarged territory of the Cenel nEogain following their defeat of the Cenel Conaill in 789.
Sanders's term for this arrangement is "covenantal nomism." From this perspective, Sanders and others have argued that Paul could not or would not have been distressed by the stringent requirements of the Law; rather, he was concerned with the misuse of the Law as an ethnic boundary marker that excluded Gentiles (especially Gentile believers in the context of the early Church).
Yet where might Brancusi have derived the extremely unusual idea of creating a boundary marker at the end of World War II, and why should he have done so?
Its designers said the tower, the tallest building in the area by far, would become "the southern boundary marker of the city centre".