boundary marker

(redirected from Boundary stone)
Also found in: Acronyms.

boundary marker

[′bau̇n·drē ‚mär·kər]
(navigation)
A radio transmitter operating at 75 megahertz and installed near the approach end of landing runway (3.9 nautical miles ± 1000 feet, or 7123 ± 305 meters) and approximately on the localizer course line.

Boundary marker

May consist of a wooden stake, surveyor’s marker, or monument located at the points where the perimeter changes directions, as indicated on a plot

boundary marker

A marker or inscribed stone that designates some type of boundary; for example, see meridian stone.

boundary marker

boundary marker
A painted object, such as a cone, disc, or other devices, used to mark the boundary of the surface usable for landing and takeoff of aircraft. The landing area may not have any boundary lights.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although punishments were inflicted for disturbing boundary marks, trees were cut down, boundary stones were tampered with or taken to another site, crosses were burnt down, and boundary shoulders were ploughed up (Vilberg, 1932).
Inset below, Maxwell Groves, three, is 'bumped' on a boundary stone by Freemen of Llantrisant Brian Groves, left, and Dean Powell
On reaching nearby Cross Inn, the trustees will literally 'bounce' children on one of the ancient boundary stones.
On reaching nearby Cross Inn, the trustees will "bounce" children on one of the ancient boundary stones - a tradition dating back to the 14th century.
Rights holders have been told to paint old boundary stones and erect white posts on the upland common to avoid further penalties under the Glastir scheme.
In the Ancient Athenian polis boundary stones proliferated.
Having carried off the boundary stones survived all differences
"We put the boundary stones from village Blace to the triangle Macedonia- Kosovo- Serbia in the longitude of 39 km.
southern Mesopotamia and long designated as kudurrus, have been known in the West since the turn of the nineteenth century, and until recently have been considered "boundary stones." They report royal grants to certain high-ranking personages of land, tax exemptions, and priestly privileges, are decorated with divine symbols or cultic scenes, and conclude with imprecations protecting the items themselves and the grants.
Beating Of The Bounds - which happens every seven years - involves the tradition of bouncing young boys's bottoms on Llantrisant's boundary stones so they remember where the edge of town lies.