Bourdon tube


Also found in: Medical.

Bourdon tube

[′bu̇r·dən ′tüb]
(engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
As a chamber is evacuated, the diminishing pressure will exert a smaller force differential on a thin-walled diaphragm or closed-end Bourdon tube that will result in motion that is proportional to the pressure differential between the chamber and the ambient atmosphere.
The operation and design of pressure gauges dates back to the mid-1800s when Eugene Bourdon invented the Bourdon tube. This same principle is used today, albeit with enhancements.
Belfield Bourdon tube pressure gauge, 2-inch Pickering governor, 1-1/2-inch American Steam Gauge & Valve Mfg.
It provides up to 150x overpressure protection compared to traditional gauges using bourdon tube technology, and two layers of process isolation for a safer field environment.
3) “An Uncertainty Analysis of Fluke Calibration Fused-Quartz Bourdon Tube Pressure Products”
The Bourdon tube developed by Eugene Bourdon in 1849 is still the most common method for mechanical pressure measurement in the oil and gas industry.
The gauges use Bourdon tube sensing elements and do not require any external power sources to operate.
These were based on the principle of barometers and utilised a Bourdon Tube, a hollow metal tube with a sealed distal end.
Furthermore, the pressure at the suction and discharge of the compressor was measured with separate bourdon tube pressure gauges.
Under laboratory test conditions, the 316L stainless steel Sta-Kool cooling element was able to reduce 400DegF (204DegC) liquid process temperatures to 100DegF (38DegC) at the active portion of the Bourdon tube. The Sta-Kool cooling element has a maximum operating temperature of 750DegF (400DegC) at 3,500 PSI operating pressure and a maximum operating pressure of 5,000 PSI at 100DegF.
A stem allows for a flush surface mount and a welded bourdon tube is standard.