Bouvines


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Bouvines

(bo͞ovēn`), village, Nord dept., N France, in Flanders. In a battle there in 1214, Philip II of France defeated the joint forces of King John of England, Emperor Otto IV, and the count of Flanders, establishing the power of the French monarchy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bouvines itself is visibly engaged with the methods and effects of postwar American abstraction: Witness the work's dimensions (roughly eight by twenty feet, unusually large for an abstract work in Paris at that time), as well as Mathieu's professed commitment both to "direct means" (the application of paint directly from the tube or projected at the paint surface by various implements) and to notion-ally improvisatory execution.
Entre el mito y la realidad>>), Martin Alvira Cabrer, de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid (<<Despues de las Navas de Tolosa y antes de Bouvines: la batalla de Muret [1213] y sus consecuencias>>) y William Chester Jordan, de la universidad de Princeton (<<The French victory at Bouvines [1214] and the persistent seduction of war>>).
The date of the battle of Bouvines deserves to be as famous as Hastings, mainly because it decided the direction of England's future development as a nation.
(6) Georges Duby, Le dimanche de Bouvines. 27 juillet 1214, Gallimard, Folio Histoire 1, Paris, 1994, 373 pp.
The Legend of Bouvines: War, Religion, and Culture in the Middle Ages.
Duby, Le Dimanche de Bouvines, Paris, Gallimard, 1973, pp.
All but one joined the English (anti-Capetian) coalition in the wars between King John of England and King Philip Augustus of France, and all were forced to submit to royal authority in the years after the Battle of Bouvines (1214) and the collapse of the French expedition to conquer England in 1216, in which Robert of Bethune had enlisted as a constable in the English army.
The following year John invaded France in an attempt to regain the provinces of Normandy, Anjou, and Touraine, which he had previously lost, but he was decisively defeated by Philip II of France at the battle of Bouvines. Meanwhile, John's arbitrary practices had aroused the ire of the English nobles, who compelled him to sign the Magna Carta in 1215.
This collection originates in a conference held at Princeton in 2014 to mark two anniversaries in French history: the famous Battle of Bouvines and the death, a century later, of King Philip IV As William Chester Jordan explains, the intention of the volume's four sections is 'fleshing out' the existing narrative alongside further 'interrogation' of what has been labelled by some the age d'or capetien (pp.