Bowerbirds


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Related to Bowerbirds: satin bowerbird

Bowerbirds

 

(Ptilonorhynchidae), a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. The body of the bowerbird is 23–35 cm in length. The plumage is gray or dark brown with yellow or orange-red, or, more rarely, green or violet coloring. There are 22 species, which inhabit Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands. The birds live in forests and shrub thickets. The males build cones, or bowers (up to 2 m high) out of sticks around small trees and decorate them and the area in front of the entrance with bright or shiny objects, including flowers, fruits, shells, and beetles. Some bowerbirds, especially the satin bowerbird (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus), decorate the walls of the bower with the flesh of fruits or crushed coal mixed with saliva. The male sings his mating call near the bower for several weeks and even months. The pubescence of the females and mating take place at the beginning of the rainy season, when insects appear which are the food for the nestlings. The nests are built in trees or in bushes. Each clutch contains one, two, or three eggs.

REFERENCE

Marshall, A. J. Bower-birds, Their Displays and Breeding Cycles. Oxford, 1954.
References in periodicals archive ?
"It will be very interesting to see how this mutually beneficial relationship between bowerbirds and these plants develops."
Native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, bowerbirds are well known for their unique courtship behavior, which involves males building ornate bowers.
Native to Australia and Papua New Guinea, bowerbirds are well known for their unique courtship behaviour, which involves males building ornate bowers.
Feeling at home: Sir David Attenborough with a bower, built by the bowerbirds.
Next, a phrase of descending whistles and scratches from the satin bowerbird, that famous species who so loves blue: ba bo de poo waaaaaawh tepu traaaawhh aaaamhh.
Bowerbirds can mimic the calls of other birds, as well as other animal sounds and human voices, but little is known about why they do it, and how they learn and expand their repertoire.
Making a scientific study of his subject, he rises to the obvious aesthetic sense in bowerbirds' work, and is still wondering.
Co-option of male courtship signals from aggressive display in bowerbirds. Proc.
Bird and whalesong, with their dialects and fashions, elaborate gibbon duetting, the creation of visual displays by bowerbirds, dolphins or chimpanzees: these are automatically excluded from any prospect of continuity with human art.
Multimodal Displays Age-related variation in female preferences drives complex sexual displays in satin bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus violaceus).
Humans begin with a body and then, like the male bowerbirds of Australia, proceed to build an elaborate construct on and around that body.