Boyle's law

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Boyle's law:

see gas lawsgas laws,
physical laws describing the behavior of a gas under various conditions of pressure, volume, and temperature. Experimental results indicate that all real gases behave in approximately the same manner, having their volume reduced by about the same proportion of the
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Boyle's law

A law of gases which states that at constant temperature the volume of a gas varies inversely with its pressure. This law, formulated by Robert Boyle (1627–1691), can also be stated thus: The product of the volume of a gas times the pressure exerted on it is a constant at a fixed temperature. The relation is approximately true for most gases, but is not followed at high pressure. The phenomenon was discovered independently by Edme Mariotte about 1650 and is known in Europe as Mariotte's law. See Kinetic theory of matter

McGraw-Hill Concise Encyclopedia of Physics. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Boyle's law

[′bȯilz ‚lȯ]
(physics)
The law that the product of the volume of a gas times its pressure is a constant at fixed temperature. Also known as Mariotte's law.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.