Brachyramphus


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Brachyramphus

 

a genus of marine birds of the family Alcidae of the order Charadriiformes. The body is 24–29 cm long. There are two species: the marbled murrelet (B. marmoratus) and Kittlitz’s murrelet (B. brevirostris). The former nests in mountain forests on the coast of the Sea of Okhotsk, in Kamchatka, and in northwestern North America. Kittlitz’s murrelet nests in the mountains along the coast of the Sea of Okhotsk, on the Chukchi Peninsula, on Wrangel Island, and in northwestern North America. The birds nest in pairs, and the clutch contains one spotted egg. The young birds apparently get to the sea by swimming down mountain streams. Murrelets feed in the coastal waters of seas, eating crabs, mollusks, and small fish. In the winter they migrate to regions with open waters.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Naturalists had generally focused their attention on collecting specimens of Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus pealei) and searching for the elusive eggs of the Marbled Murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) and other poorly known seabirds, particularly the Ancient Murrelet (Synthliboramphus antiquus).
The Kittlitz's Murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) is a broadly distributed but uncommon seabird species endemic to coastal Alaska and eastern Russia.
Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris) is a small, rare seabird of the Northern Pacific with a declining population.
And with that fact Bradfield is off, charging headlong into Alaska's cul-de-sacs and wooded landscapes to prove that "love changes what it's drawn to" ("Nonnative Invasive") and that "what's daily and familiar is worth a second look" ("Brachyramphus marmoratus").
Over two million seabirds of almost thirty species nest along the California, Oregon, and Washington coasts, including three species listed as threatened and endangered: the brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis), the California least tern (Sterna antillarum browni), and the marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus)(Bonnell and Dailey 1993).
A discussion of climate change and wildlife in Alaska would be incomplete without mention of two unusual bird species also associated strongly with ice: the threatened spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri), which winters within the pack ice in shallow waters of the northern Bering Sea, and the Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris), a small seabird that visits nearshore waters in summer and is associated with tidewater glaciers.
Thanks to the Navy, this 225-acre stand of trees is the only remnant of the mighty forests that once stretched from the foothills of the Cascades in eastern Washington state to the shores of the Puget Sound, and home to a nesting colony of marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus), a bird listed as threatened in the Pacific Northwest.
Diving into the cool, clear waters the robin-sized MARBLED MURRELET (Brachyramphus marmoratus marmoratus) swims adeptly using her strong wings like fins.
Several seabird species, such as the marbled murrelet, Brachyramphus marmoratus, and short-tailed albatross, Phoebastria albatrus (excluding U.S.
paradisaea Pontoppidan, arctic I R tern Xema sabini (Sabine), Sabine's I R gull Family Alcidae (auks, murres, and puffins) Brachyramphus perdix (Pallas), I R long-billed murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus I R (Gmelin), ancient murrelet Uria lomvia (Linnaeus), I R thick-billed murre Order Columbiformes (pigeons and doves) Family Columbidae (pigeons and doves) Columba fasciata Say, I R band-tailed pigeon C.