Bradbury


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Bradbury

1. Sir Malcolm (Stanley). 1932--2000, British novelist and critic. His novels include The History Man (1975), Rates of Exchange (1983), Cuts (1988), and Doctor Criminale (1992)
2. Ray. born 1920, US science-fiction writer. His novels include Fahrenheit 451 (1953), Death is a Lonely Business (1986), and A Graveyard for Lunatics (1990)
References in periodicals archive ?
While this attempt to chronicle Bradbury's life and work as an author of fiction (Bradbury's extensive career as a writer of drama for stage, screen, and television is referred to only in passing) is admirable, the discussion is overburdened with jargon-laden critical theory.
Veteran Aussie documaker David Bradbury blows hot and cold in "Blowin' in the Wind." Initially a potent cry against the use of depleted uranium in modern warfare, film spins off into speculation on the side effects of increased U.S.
Only one horse - Silver Fame in the 1940s and '50s - has won more (ten) Cheltenham races than Bradbury Star, who was placed 16 times and earned more than pounds 350,000 in prize-money.
Plans call for exhibits featuring Bradbury's "Martian Chronicles" and "Fahrenheit 451," as well as his life in Waukegan and his love of books and libraries.
A court heard Bradbury lashed out at Mr Moore as she suffered from a condition which causes her to hoard goods and protect them in a 'pathological way.' She was initially charged with intent to cause grievous bodily harm but prosecutors accepted her guilty plea to unlawful wounding.
The statue will be displayed in time for Bradbury's birthday at the Waukegan Public Library in Lake County, Illinois where Bradbury was born and raised.
CCTV footage shown at a hearing this week showed Bradbury, wearing an England football shirt, returning to his vehicle at 4.42pm, some 78 minutes after parking up near his home.
She came forward after receiving a letter from the trust in the wake of Bradbury's conviction.
Democrats have opposed Bradbury's nomination for a litany of reasons, including that he wrote the legal justifications that authorized "enhanced interrogation techniques" under the George W.
Six years on from his ban, Mr Bradbury strolled in to Huddersfield Town Hall unchallenged to urge senior councillors to reverse it.
Miss Bradbury died after suffering massive internal injuries - with paramedics arriving at her home in west Wales and finding the two-bedroom property smashed up, as well as blood smeared over banisters and walls.